Ellern

Ellern is the Middle English form of Old English ellærn meaning “elder tree, elderberry tree”. Origin: Old English Variants: Ellærn (Old English) Ellarn (Old English)  

Melody

Melody refers to a pleasant-sounding succession or arrangement of sounds. It means “singing, chanting” which comes from Middle English melodie via Old French deriving from Latin melōdia, itself derived from Ancient Greek melōidíā (song, singing; chant; music) made up from Ancient Greek melos (song, tune, music) and ōidḗ, a contracted form of aoidḗ (song, ode; legend, tale, story), both of which derive from an unknown etymology….

Truman

Truman comes from an English surname meaning “trusty man, faithful man” from Middle English trewe (true) via Old English treow (truth, fidelity) which comes from Proto-Germanic *triwwiz (true, faithful) from PIE *drew-, *deru- (firm, hard, solid, steadfast); combined with man from Proto-Germanic *mann (man) from PIE *mon- (man, human being). It may have originated as a nickname for someone who was an honest or faithful man. Truman is…

Grayson

Grayson comes from an English surname meaning “son of the steward”, an occupational name referring to someone who was in charge of an estate. It derives from Middle English greyve (steward) with the -son suffix. It could also mean “son of Gray”, referring to either someone who is gray-haired, or from given name Gratus meaning “pleasing, acceptable, agreeable, welcome” from Latin…

Spencer

Spencer comes from an English surname, an occupational name for someone who was in charge of dispensing provisions in a rich or a royal household, so essentially meaning “butler” or “steward”. The name comes from Middle English spence meaning “larder” from Old French despense (to dispense, to distribute) from Latin dispendere (to spend) from the Latin prefix dis- (apart, two, asunder) from Proto-Indo-European *dwís (twice,…

Drake

Drake comes from an English surname meaning “dragon, snake”  from Old English Draca, which comes from Latin draco (dragon) derived from Proto-Indo-European drakon (dragon, serpent) from *derḱ- (to see). Drake is also a Middle English word meaning “male duck” from Proto-Germanic *anudrekô, made up of *anudz via Proto-Indo-European *h₂énh₂ts (duck) and Proto-Germanic *rekô (king, chief) via Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (king, chief). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Drayke (English) Draki (Old Norse) Draco (Latinized Ancient…

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning “provisions, supplies” from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess  

Ruth

Ruth is a Hebrew female name of uncertain origin though the most popular theory is that it is linked to Hebrew re’ut meaning “companion” or “friend”, though other possible theories include: “refreshment”, “appearance, beauty”, and “pasture”. Ruth may also be related to Middle English word ruthe or reuth meaning “pity, compassion”, “sorrow, grief” derived from Old Norse hryggð (sorrow, grief). Ruth is also a…

Beck

Beck is an English surname derived from German surname Bach meaning “brook, stream”, a cognate of Old Norse bekkr (stream, brook). It could also be a short form of Becker, another Germanic surname meaning “baker”. Beck could also be a short form of Beckett, another English surname that comes from the same source as Bach. It also comes from Middle…