Freya

Freya is the goddess of love, death, beauty, fertility and war in Norse mythology, and the twin sister of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse freyja meaning “lady” which comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjǭ (lady, wife of a lord) which derives from a PIE root word. There seems to be some thought that Freya and Frigg were once the same goddess (Frigg being the…

Lunafreya

Lunafreya is a name I came across, the name of a protagonist in the Final Fantasy XV game and as far as I can find out, it seems to have first been created for the game. Although I’ve never played any of the games I’m pretty familiar with them and they are chock full of…

Donna

Donna comes from the Italian word meaning “woman,” or “lady”, used as a title of respect for the lady of the house. It derives from Latin domina (lady, mistress of the house) from a Proto-Indo-European source, either from *demh₂- (to tame, subdue) or from *dṓm (house, home) via root *dem- (to build). Donna could also be used as a feminine form of Donald, the…

Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a…

Belladonna

Belladonna is an Italian name which means “beautiful lady” from Italian elements bella (beautiful) and donna (lady). Bella is derived from Latin bellus meaning “beautiful, pretty, handsome”, while Donna is also derived from Latin domina “lady, mistress of the house”. It’s the name of a plant known as deadly nightshade, which is poisonous. It supposedly got its name Belladonna because it was used by women to dilate the…

Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master). Origin: Aramaic Variants: Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek) Martta (Finnish) Marthe (French, Norwegian) Marte (Norwegian) Márta (Hungarian) Morta (Lithuanian) Maata (Maori) Marfa (Russian)  

Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who…