Heidi

Heidi is the German diminutive of Adelheid, which is the German and Dutch form of Adelaide meaning “noble kind” or “noble sort” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and  heid (kind, sort, type).

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Heidy (English, Spanish)
  • Heida (German)
  • Adelheid (German, Dutch)
  • Adelaide (French, English, Italian, Portuguese)
  • Adalheidis (Ancient Germanic)

 

Advertisements

Adeline

Adeline (pr. a-du-leen and ad-a-lien) was originally used as a French diminutive of Adèle, the French form of Adela which comes from Germanic element adal meaning “noble”.

Nicknames: Addie/Addy, Aline, Leen/Line (pr. leen), Aline, Alene

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Adelina (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, German, Bulgarian)
  • Adalyn (English)
  • Adalynn (English)
  • Adelyn (English)
  • Adele (German, Italian, Finnish, English)
  • Adèle (French)

 

Briana

Briana is the feminine form of Brian, an Irish name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Old Celtic element bre meaning “hill” which, by extension, also means “high, noble”.It could also be related to Celtic brig- or brigant- meaning “high”, briga- meaning “might” and “power”, or brigh- meaning “noble, strong, virtuous”. Briana is a character in The Faerie Queen, an epic poem written by English poet Edmund Spenser, an allegorical work celebrating the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. It was published between 1590 and 1596 though he died before he could finish the entirety of the poem.

Nicknames: Bri/Bree

Origin: Old Celtic

Variants:

  • Brianna
  • Bryana
  • Bryanna
  • Breanna
  • Brina
  • Bryna
  • Breann
  • Brianne
  • Breanne
  • Breeanne
  • Bryanne

 

Male forms:

  • Brian
  • Brion
  • Bryan
  • Bryon

 

Saeran

Saeran seems to be a male name possibly of Irish origin maning “noble” although I’m not sure of the accuracy of that. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Welsh Saer meaning “carpenter, wright” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “Saer the younger” or “little Saer”. There’s a church in Wales called St. Saeran’s Church dedicated to Saint Saeran, a Celtic bishop.

Saeran also seems to be a Korean male name (also spelled Serran) written with Korean hangul meaning “three + that/what is called” or “bird + that/what is called” though it has several meanings in hanja (Korean reading of Chinese characters) with the 세 (se) reading such as:

  • 世 (generation; world; society; lifetime)

  • 稅 (tax; duty)
  • 勢 (power, force; energy; military strength)

  • 歲 (year; age)
  • 細 (fine, thin; slender)
  • 洗 (to wash)
  • 貰 (get; have; obtain)
  • 笹 (bamboo grass)
  • 說 (explain; seek; talk)

and with the 란 (ran): 

  • 欄 (column)
  • 卵 (egg, ovum)
  • 蘭 (orchid)

Origin: Irish, Welsh, Korean

Variants:

  • Serran
  • Seran

 

Alesia

Alesia (pr. a-lee-see-yah) was the name of an ancient Gaulish city in which a decisive battle between Julius Caesar against the Gauls determined the victor of the Gallic tribes and Gaul (the Romans won). I’m not sure what the origin or meaning behind the name is. It might be derived from Greek alexis meaning “defender, helper”. In the modern era, Alesia could be a variant spelling of Alicia, a Latinized form of Alice which comes from Old French Aalis which itself comes from Old Germanic name Adalheidis made up from adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type) meaning “noble kind” or “noble type”.

Origin: Greek, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Alicia (Spanish, English)
  • Alecia (English)
  • Alice (English, French, Portuguese, Italian)

 

Ella

Ella comes from Germanic element alja meaning “other, another, foreign” and from which the name Eleanor/Alianor comes from. Ella could also be a nickname for names beginning and ending with ella such as Gabriella (feminine form of Gabriel meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”) and Daniella (feminine form of Daniel meaning “God is my judge”), Elizabeth (meaning “God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”) and Eleanor, which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”. Ella is also the Spanish and Italian word for “she”.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alia (Ancient Germanic)

 

Ryu

Ryu (also spelled Ryū and Ryuu) is a Japanese male name meaning “dragon” with various kanji such as: 龍 “dragon” and 竜 “dragon”; other meanings are 隆 “noble, prosperous”, 立 “to stand up, to erect, to set up”, 笠 “bamboo hat, shade”, and likely other meanings. Ryu could also be used in combination with other names, such as Ryutaro or Ryuunosuke.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Ryū
  • Ryuu

 

Della

Della originally started out as a nickname for names like Adela, from Germanic element adal meaning “noble”, and Adelaide, the French form of Germanic Adalheidis meaning “noble character” or “noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type). Della is also an Italian word and surname meaning “of the”, originally used to refer to the place a person originally came from or the name of their father. It comes from Latin di + la.

Origin: Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Dela

 

Lenora

Lenora is a short form of Elenora, a variant form of Eleanor which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Consort of France and England during the 12th century, is said to have been named after her mother Aenor, and Aliénor distinguished her as the other Aenor. However, since the name had been used well before Eleanor of Aquitaine’s birth, it seems likely that that particular meaning was only used for mother and daughter.

Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”

Origin: Germanic, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Elenora (English)
  • Eleanora (English)
  • Lenore (English)
  • Leanora (English)
  • Alienor (Occitan)
  • Aliénor (Occitan)
  • Alianor (French, English)
  • Alienora (Latin)

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)