Female, G names, Gaulish, Kin/Family, Male, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Germaine

Germaine is a French female name, the feminine form of Germain, the French form of Germanus, an Ancient Roman cognomen given to those who were from Germany or who came from one of the various Germanic tribes at the time. The origin of the name is uncertain; it may be derived from a Celtic or Gaulish word,… Continue reading Germaine

Female, K names, Nature, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Kalina

Kalina is a Slavic female name meaning "viburnum tree" or "guelder rose". Kalina is also a Czech, Polish, and German surname originating from the given name or as a locational name from someone who came from any of several places called Kalina in Poland. Kalina is also a Finnish word meaning "clatter, clang, rattle". Origin:… Continue reading Kalina

Female, Place names, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Sound, Virtues/Attributes

Rhonda

Rhonda is a female given name of uncertain meaning. It could be made up from Welsh elements rhon (pike, lance) and da (good). It's also possible that it may be derived from Rhondda, the name of a valley and former coal mine in Wales. The meaning behind it is also unknown, though it could mean "noisy", related to… Continue reading Rhonda

Gaelic, Male, Mythology, Norse mythology, Proto-Indo-European, T names, Thunder/Lightning, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Torin

Torin is a male given name with several possible etymologies: it's an Irish Gaelic name meaning "chief"; it could be related to Irish toirneach meaning "thunder" or Old Irish torann meaning "noise; noise of battle; thunder; tumult); Torin could also be a contracted form of Thorfinn or Torfinn, a Scandinavian male name made up of Thor, the Norse god of thunder whose… Continue reading Torin

E names, Greek mythology, Male, Mythology, Place names, Proto-Indo-European, Sound, Virtues/Attributes

Eryx

Eryx is the name of a mythological figure in Greek mythology, the king of an ancient city eponymously named after him (or he after it). He was the son of the goddess Aphrodite and either Poseidon or Butes, one of the Argonauts who was saved by Aphrodite from the Sirens. Eryx was supposed to be an excellent boxer though he… Continue reading Eryx

Ancient Greek, Animals, Birds, C names, Color, Female, Gray, Greek mythology, Green, Mythology, Proto-Indo-European, Swallow, Virtues/Attributes

Celadonia

Celadonia is an elaborated form of Celadon, referring to a pale greenish-gray color as well as also referring to a type of ceramic pottery with pale green glaze. It comes from French céladon which derives from Ancient Greek Keladon, the name of a character in Ovid's Metamorphosis. I couldn't find an exact meaning behind it though I've seen it… Continue reading Celadonia

Ancient Greek, Coptic, Female, Finnish, Greek mythology, K names, Mythology, Nickname names, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Kolina

Kolina is a female given name. I've seen many sites claim its from Greek meaning "pure" so I'm assuming it's somehow related to Katherine, the English form of Greek Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek… Continue reading Kolina

Female, J names, Japanese, Korean, Male, Mythology, Nature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Roman mythology, Seasons, Sound, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Juno

Juno is the wife of the the Roman god Jupiter and the Roman goddess of marriage and women, making her the Greek counterpart of Hera. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it could be linked to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful, young” from Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂ey- (vital force, life, age, eternity). Juno is traditionally a female given name but… Continue reading Juno

Arthurian legends & myths, Celtic, Emotion/Feelings, Male, Pictish, Sorrow, Sound, T names

Tristan

Tristan is the Old French form of Drustan,  a Pictish diminutive of Drust likely derived from Celtic drest meaning "riot" or "tumult", possibly in reference to the noise of the "clanking of swords". The spelling was changed to resemble the French word triste meaning "sad, sorrowful", likely because of the tragic affair of Tristan and Isolde- they fell in love after drinking… Continue reading Tristan