Hill

Hill comes from an English surname with several possible meanings such as:

  • it may have derived from a topographical name for someone who lived near or on a hill; the name comes from Old English hyll borrowed from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to rise, to be tall);
  • it may also have been used as a medieval given name, a shortened form of Hilary/Hillary, derived from Latin hilarius meaning “cheerful, merry, happy”;
  • it may also derive from any personal name beginning with the Germanic element hild meaning “battle” such as Hilda;

Origin:  Proto-Indo-European, Latin, Germanic

 

 

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Willow

Willow comes from Old English welig from Proto-Germanic *wiligaz via Proto-Indo-European *wel meaning “to turn, to wind, twist”. Willow is the name of a tree or shrub from the genus Salix, which grows along damp or watery areas. They are tough and flexible. It’s also a surname originally referring to somone who lived near a willow tree.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Northa

Northa is a feminine form of North, one of the four cardinal points of the compass referring to an area or geography facing towards north. The word comes from Old English norð ultimately deriving from Proto-Indo-European *ner meaning “left, below” in reference to north being to the left of the rising sun. Northa also seems to be a surname although I couldn’t find any information behind it as a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • North (English; unisex)

 

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Draven

Draven seems to come from an English surname; it was popularized by the 1994 movie The Crow based on the comic book series, though the last name was given to the character in the movie. Although the popular consensus seems to be that the name is somehow derived from d’raven meaning “of the raven”, there’s no real accuracy to that statement, along with other meanings I’ve seen attached to the name such as “child of beautiful shadows” and “avenger”, although the accuracy for the last two seem far more murkier. Another possible meaning I’ve seen is that it comes from an Old English word drǽfend meaning “hunter”, but once again I can’t attest to the accuracy of that either.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Dravin (English)

 

Tanner

Tanner comes from an English surname, an occupational name that referred to someone who tanned hides. It derives from Old French taneor or Old English tannere which ultimately derives from Celtic tanno meaning “green oak” or “oak tree”.

Origin: Celtic

 

 

Birch

Birch is the name of a tree from Old English berc and beorc meaning “birch” which comes from a Proto-Indo-European source meaning “to gleam, shine, white”. Birch is also a surname referring to someone who lived near some birch trees.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Penny

Origin: Greek, Germanic

Meaning: Penny is usually used as a nickname for Penelope, a Greek feminine name of uncertain etymology but which could be derived from Greek penelops, referring to a type of duck.

Penelope could be also be derived from Greek pene (threads, weft) and ops (face, eye). This meaning seems more fitting for the character in Greek mythology: Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, who was apparently faithful to him for the twenty years he was gone, despite the many persistant suitors who attempt to woo her with marriage. In an attempt to ward off their persistance, Penelope tells them that she will choose a suitor when she has finished weaving a burial shroud for Odysseus, though every night she undoes some of it to give her more time. This goes on for 3 years before her trick is discovered.

Penelope (or Penelopeia) is also the name of a dryad, the daughter of Dryops and portrayed as the mother of Pan, the god of shepherds and hunters.

Penny is also a coin, an Old English word derived from a Proto-Germanic source of unknown meaning.

Variants:

  • Penelope (Greek)
  • Pénélope (French)
  • Penélope (Spanish, Portuguese)