Renwick

Renwick comes from a surname derived from a place name meaning "raven settlement", derived from Old English given name Hræfn meaning "raven" from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz (raven) which comes from a Proto-Indo-European root word word; and wick meaning "village, settlement, dwelling" from Germanic *wīk- (settlement, village, dwelling) via Latin vicus (village; hamlet; street; neighborhood; row of houses) which ultimately derives from Proto-Indo-European *weyḱ- (to settle; settlement). Nicknames: … Continue reading Renwick

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Wilfrid

Wilfrid is a variant spelling of Wilfred, an English male name meaning "desiring peace" or "desires peace" from Ancient Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and frið (peace). Nicknames: Wil/Will, Wilf Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Wilfred (English) Willifrid (Ancient Germanic) Wilfrith (Anglo-Saxon) Wilfrið (Anglo-Saxon) Guifré (Catalan) Vilfred (Danish) Wilfried (German) Vilfredo (Italian) Wilfredo (Spanish)  

Bailey

Bailey is a unisex given name which comes from an English surname with several possible meanings: it's an occupational surname meaning "bailiff", referring to someone who was an officer of the court, similar to a sheriff or a sheriff's deputy in charge with keeping order; it derives from Latin bāiulus (carrier, porter; manager, steward); it also … Continue reading Bailey

Clifford

Clifford is an English male name derived from a surname meaning "ford by a cliff" originally used to refer to someone who lived near one. It's made up of Old English elements clif (cliff) derived from Proto-Germanic *klibą (to stick) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *gleybʰ; and Old English ford (ford) also derived from Proto-Germanic *furduz (ford) ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing). Nicknames: Cliff, Ford … Continue reading Clifford

Wade

Wade comes from an English surname, either derived from Old English wæd meaning "ford" or "shallow water", used to refer to someone who lived near a ford; it comes from Proto-Germanic wadą. Wade may also be derived from an Old English given name, Wada, which comes from Old English wadan meaning "to go" from Proto-Germanic wadaną (to wade, to walk) via Proto-Indo-European *weh₂dʰ- (to … Continue reading Wade

Hill

Hill comes from an English surname with several possible meanings such as: it may have derived from a topographical name for someone who lived near or on a hill; the name comes from Old English hyll borrowed from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to rise, to be tall); it may also have been used … Continue reading Hill

Willow

Willow comes from Old English welig from Proto-Germanic *wiligaz via Proto-Indo-European *wel meaning "to turn, to wind, twist". Willow is the name of a tree or shrub from the genus Salix, which grows along damp or watery areas. They are tough and flexible. It's also a surname originally referring to somone who lived near a willow tree. Origin: Proto-Indo-European   … Continue reading Willow

Northa

Northa is a feminine form of North, one of the four cardinal points of the compass referring to an area or geography facing towards north. The word comes from Old English norð ultimately deriving from Proto-Indo-European *ner meaning "left, below" in reference to north being to the left of the rising sun. Northa also seems to be a surname … Continue reading Northa

Queenie

Queenie was originally used as a nickname for Queen, a title for a female sovereign or monarch from Old English cwen meaning "woman, wife, consort" from Proto-Germanic *kweniz (woman). Origin: Proto-Germanic Variants: Queen  

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning "king, ruler", which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from "kin, family, clan", originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It's used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it's used … Continue reading King