Maris

Maris is a female name taken from Latin meaning "of the sea" from Latin mare (sea) derived from Proto-Italic *mari (sea) from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). It comes from the Latin title stella maris "star of the sea" used for the Virgin Mary. Maris may also come from Latin mās meaning "male". Maris is also the name of an Etruscan god of agriculture and fertility, his … Continue reading Maris

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Tyson

Tyson comes from an English surname, either a variant of Dyson, a matronymic surname meaning "son of Dye", Dye being a medieval form of Dionysia, the female form of Dionysius, the Greek god of vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite … Continue reading Tyson

Noelle

Noelle is the feminine form of Noel (or French Noël) which means "Christmas" derived from Latin natalis (of or relating to birth) which comes Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to produce, beget; to give birth). Noelle is also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Noëlle (French, Dutch) Noelle (English) Noèle (French) Noela (Galician) Noelia (Spanish) Noella (French) Noelene (English)   … Continue reading Noelle

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning "provisions, supplies" from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess  

Elaine

Elaine is an Old French form of Helen, the English form of Greek Helene  an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. There are several characters in Arthurian legend named Elaine, such as the name of the mother of Lancelot; Elaine of Corbenic, … Continue reading Elaine

Foy

Foy comes from a surname with several possible meanings and origins: it may be derived from Old French foi or from Latin fides meaning "faith", either used as a nickname for someone who was a pious person or someone who often swore; it may also be a medieval French female name also derived from Foy (or Faith);  it may also … Continue reading Foy

Chase

Chase is a given name derived from an English surname meaning "chase, hunt" derived from Old French chacier (to hunt) via Latin captiare (catch). It was an occupational surname for a huntsman or given as a nickname for an exceptionally skilled hunter. Origin: Latin Variants: Chace (English)  

Emmeline

Emmeline is an Old French form of Germanic name Amalia, derived from Germanic word amal meaning "work" in reference to the idea of industriousness and fertility. Origin: Germanic Variants: Emmaline (English) Emmalyn (English) Emmelyn (English) Emelina (Spanish) Amelina (Ancient Germanic) Amalia (German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Romanian) Amelia (English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German) Émeline (French)  

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning "gentle power" or "gentle strength". It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means "bright, brilliant" In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent … Continue reading Bellicent