Elaine

Elaine is an Old French form of Helen, the English form of Greek Helene  an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. There are several characters in Arthurian legend named Elaine, such as the name of the mother of Lancelot; Elaine of Corbenic, the mother of Lancelot’s illegitimate son Galahad; and Elaine of Astolat, who features in Lord Alfred Tennyson’s poem The Lady of Shalott, a maiden who falls into an unrequited love with Lancelot.

Origin: Ancient Greek

 

Variants:

  • Elayne (English)
  • Elaina (English)
  • Elene (Georgian, Sardinian)
  • Elena (Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, Medieval Slavic, English)

 

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Lancelot

Lancelot is one of the Knights of the Round Table who was raised by the Lady of the Lake who later has an affair with Guinevere, the wife of his king Arthur, and which ultimately leads to Arthur’s death. Lancelot is a double diminutive of Lanzo, a Germanic male name  meaning “land” though it’s nickname, Lance, is often associated with the weapon.

Nicknames: Lance

Origin: Ancient Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Launcelot
  • Lancelin
  • Lancelyn

 

Foy

Foy comes from a surname with several possible meanings and origins:

  • it may be derived from Old French foi or from Latin fides meaning “faith”, either used as a nickname for someone who was a pious person or someone who often swore;
  • it may also be a medieval French female name also derived from Foy (or Faith); 
  • it may also be an anglicized of Irish surname Fahey, which comes from Gaelic Ó Fathaidh meaning “descendant of Fathadh”, the latter being a male given name meaning “foundation, base”;
  • it may also be a variant of O’Fee, also an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fiaich meaning “descendant of Fiach”, the latter meaning “raven”.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Foi (Old French)

 

Chase

Chase is a given name derived from an English surname meaning “chase, hunt” derived from Old French chacier (to hunt) via Latin captiare (catch). It was an occupational surname for a huntsman or given as a nickname for an exceptionally skilled hunter.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Chace (English)

 

Emmeline

Emmeline is an Old French form of Germanic name Amalia, derived from Germanic word amal meaning “work” in reference to the idea of industriousness and fertility.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Emmaline (English)
  • Emmalyn (English)
  • Emmelyn (English)
  • Emelina (Spanish)
  • Amelina (Ancient Germanic)
  • Amalia (German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Romanian)
  • Amelia (English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German)
  • Émeline (French)

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant

 

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning “distilled wine” or “burnt wine”. It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

Origin: Dutch, Old English, Proto-Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Brandee (English)
  • Brandi (English)
  • Brandie (English)
  • Brande (English)
  • Branda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Brandon
  • Branden

 

Trick

Trick is a nickname for Patrick comes from Latin Patricius meaning “patrician” used to refer to the elite of the Roman aristocracy descended from the founding fathers of Rome, derived from Latin patres (father). It has since attained the idea of “nobleman, noble”.

Trick is also an English word meaning “to cheat, deceive” and refers to someone playing a prank. It’s derived from Old Northern French trique from trikier meaning “to deceive, to cheat” which could be from Latin tricari meaning “be evasive, shuffle”

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Patrick

 

Topaz

Topaz comes from Old French topaze, topace which comes from Greek topazos which is derived from Sanskrit tapas meaning “heat, fire”. However, according to Roman author, naturalist, and philosopher Pliny, the name came from a remote island in the Red Sea called Topazein meaning “to divine, to locate” though that seems to be folk etymology rather than fact.

Topaz is the birthstone of Novemer and associated with love and good luck, as well as believed to have healing properties.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Topaze

 

Esmeralda

Esmeralda is the Spanish and Portuguese word for “emerald”, also used as a given name. It comes from Old French esmeraude via Vulgar Latin (which is the common speech of Latin including different dialects) esmeralda, esmeraldus which comes from Ancient Greek smaragdos meaning “green gem”. That itself could come from a Semitic source such as Hebrew baraket or bareqeth meaning “emerald, shine” or Arabic barq “lightning”.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic

Variants:

  • Esmeraude (Old French)
  • Emeraude (French)
  • Émeraude (French)
  • Emerald (English)