Female, I names, Kin/Family, Literature, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Imogen

Imogen was first used by Shakespeare in his play Cymbeline (1609), believed to have been a misspelling of an already existing name, Innogen, a name of uncertain meaning. The name is believed to have been derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden girl" and "daughter" which ultimately derives from PIE root word *ǵenh₁-(to produce, to beget, to give birth). Innogen is… Continue reading Imogen

Elements, Female, Male, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes, Water, Word names

Ryan

Ryan comes from an Irish surname, a shortened form of O'Ryan which itself is the anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Riagháin (or Ó Riain) meaning "descendant of Rian", a name of uncertain etymology though the most popular suggestion is that it is made up of Irish rí meaning "king" combined with a diminutive suffix, so the name essentially means… Continue reading Ryan

B names, Celtic, Gaulish/Celtic mythology, Irish mythology, Male, Mythology, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Brian

Brian is an Irish name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Old Celtic element bre meaning “hill” which, by extension, also means “high, noble”. It could also be related to Celtic brig- or brigant- meaning “high”, briga- meaning “might” and “power”, or brigh- meaning “noble, strong, virtuous”. Brian is also a surname originating from the given name. Brian… Continue reading Brian

Animals, C names, Dog, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes, Wolf

Conri

Conri is an anglicized form of Irish Conrí meaning "wolf king" made up from Old Irish con (dog, hound, wolf) which comes from Proto-Celtic *kū (dog; wolf) derived from PIE *ḱwṓ (dog); and Old Irish rí (king) from Proto-Celtic *rīxs (king) derived from PIE *h₃rḗǵs (king, ruler) which derives from root word *h₃reǵ- meaning "to straighten, to right oneself". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Conrí (Irish)  

J names, Kin/Family, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names

Jefferson

Jefferson comes from an English surname, a patrynomic surname meaning "son of Jeffrey", Jeffrey being a medieval variant of Geoffrey, the Norman-French form of a Germanic name. The second element of the name comes from Germanic frid meaning "peace" from Proto-Germanic *friþuz (peace, tranquility; sanctuary, refuge) from PIE *priHós (beloved, dear) from root word *preyH- (to love, to please). The first element is a little… Continue reading Jefferson

Black/Dark, Color, Female, Food, Honey, M names, Nature, Place names, Proto-Celtic, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Melrose

Melrose comes from an English surname derived from a place name in Scotland meaning "barren moor" or "barren heath" from Welsh moel (bare, barren; bald) from Proto-Celtic *maylos; and rhos (moor, heath), though the second element may also be derived from Old Irish ros meaning "promontory". However, Melrose as a given name could also be a combination of Mel, either a short… Continue reading Melrose

A names, Animals, Bears/Bear cubs, Literature, Male, Proto-Celtic, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Artigal

Artigal is a very unusual name. From what I could find, it could be a variant spelling of Artegal, itself an anglicized form of Ardghal, an Irish male name meaning "high valor" from Old Irish ard (high) from Proto-Celtic *ardwos derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erHdʰ- (high; to grow); and gal (valor, fury) via Proto-Celtic *galā (might, ability). Artegal (Arthegall) is also the name of a knight… Continue reading Artigal

D names, Emotion/Feelings, Female, Irish, Irish mythology, Kin/Family, Mythology, Nature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Sorrow, Virtues/Attributes

Deirdre

Deirdre is the name of a tragic heroine in Irish legend, which is why she's known as Deirdre of the Sorrows. Before she was born her beauty was foretold by a druid, a beauty that would only bring strife and sorrow as kings and lords would go to war over her. King Conchobhar (Connor) decided to… Continue reading Deirdre

E names, Female, Food, Gaelic, Hebrew, Irish mythology, Mythology, Virtues/Attributes

Edna

Edna is a female name which comes from two different sources: the first is that it's a Hebrew name meaning "pleasure" or "delight"; it's also an anglicized form of Eithne, a Gaelic modern form of Old Irish Ethniu meaning "kernel, grain". In Irish mythology, Ethniu is the daughter of Balor, king of the Fomorians, a supernatural race sometimes depicted as… Continue reading Edna