Sigmund

Sigmund is the name of a hero in Norse mythology, the son of King Völsung. When his sister Signy marries Siggeir, king of Gautland, a wedding feast is held and the god Odin appears disguised as an old beggar. He plunges a sword into a tree, Barnstokkr, which stands in the center of King Völsung's hall, and whichever man is able to pull it … Continue reading Sigmund

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Brant

Brant comes from an English surname which derives from an Old Norse given name, Brandr, meaning either "sword" or "fire" from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (firebrand, torch; sword; flaming; fire) via Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to seethe; spew forth; burn). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Brandr (Ancient Scandinavian) Brand (English) Brandt (English)  

Astin

Astin is an English surname, a contraction of Anglo-Norman given name Asketin, itself a diminutive of Old Norse Ásketill made up of Old Norse elements áss (god) derived from Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity) from a Proto-Indo-European root word, and ketill (cauldron, helmet) from Proto-Germanic *katilaz (kettle, bucket, vessel) which may have been derived from Latin catillus (small bowl, dish) which comes from Proto-Italiac *katinos-, so the name essentially means "god's … Continue reading Astin

Aithley

Aithley is an English female name which seems to have originally been a surname. The meaning behind it is unclear. I've seen it listed as meaning "born in a garden" but I'm not too convinced of the meaning. I know that the last part, -ley, comes from Old English lēah meaning "clearing, meadow, woodland", so the surname might have … Continue reading Aithley

Frey

Frey is a variant of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the twin brother of Freya, as well as the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak. His name comes from … Continue reading Frey

Odin

Odin is an Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which comes from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It comes from Proto-Germanic *Wodanaz meaning "poetic fury" derived from *wodaz (rage, manic inspiration, mad, furious, possessed). In Norse mythology, Odin is the chief god of the Norse pantheon, a complex character who presided over war, art, wisdom, death, and magic, as well as poetry … Continue reading Odin

Maxwell

Maxwell comes from a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", Mack possibly being a form of Magnus, a given name derived from Latin meaning "great", combined with Old English wella (stream). Mack could also be derived from Gaelic mac (son); Macca might also be derived from Old Norse makr "easy to deal with". Nicknames: Max Origin: Latin, Gaelic