Persia

Persia is the former name of Iran. The name originated in the fifth century BC by the Ancient Greeks, who gave it to the empire of Cyrus the Great, known as the Achaemenid Empire (also known as the First Persian Empire) based in Western Asia. The name is based on Old Persian Parsa derived from an unknown origin …

Pleasant

Pleasant comes from an English word meaning "pleasant, delightful, agreeable". It comes from Old French plaisant (pleasant, nice) via plaisir (to please) from Latin placēre (to be acceptable, liked) deriving from a PIE root word. Pleasant is also an English surname. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Female forms: Pleasance (Medieval English, Old French)  

Prentice

Prentice comes from an English surname, a shortened form of apprentice, referring to someone who is being trained in a specific trade or craft. It comes from Old French aprentis (apprentice) via aprendre (to learn; to teach) from Latin apprehendere (to take hold, to grasp; to learn), made up of ad- (to, towards, at) + prehendō (lay hold of, seize), both deriving …

Parisa

Parisa is a Persian female name meaning "like a fairy" or "fairy-like", made up of Persian pari پری (fairy) and sâ (like, resembling). Origin: Persian Variants: Pareesa (Persian) Parysatis (Persian) Parisatis (Persian) Pari (Persian)  

Pressyne

Pressyne was the name of a fairy or water sprite in European folklore. Legend has it that King Elynas of Albany (another name of Scotland at the time) had fallen in love with her and wanted her to be his wife. She agreed but with one condition- that he make an oath to never see her when …

Plumeria

Plumeria is the name of a genus of flowering plants, also known as frangipani. It was named after French botanist Charles Plumier. The origin of the surname is uncertain though it could be related to French plume meaning "feather; quill" via Latin pluma (feather, plume) derived from a PIE root word. It may have originated as an occupational …

Protea

Protea is the name of a genus of South African flowering plants, also known as sugarbushes or fynbos. It was named after the Greek god Proteus who could change his form at will in order to avoid telling the future. The name comes from Ancient Greek protos meaning "first". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Male forms: Proteus (Ancient Greek)  

Pīkake

Pīkake (pr. pee-kah-kay) is the Hawaiian word for the jasmine flower as well as the Hawaiian word for the peacock. Apparently, Princess Kaiulani (the last Crown princess of Hawaii) loved both peacocks and jasmine flower, so when jasmine was first introduced to Hawaii it quickly became her favorite flower, named after her favorite animal. Origin: Hawaiian Variants: …

Perina

Perina could be a variant spelling of Pierina, an Italian diminutive of Piera, the feminine form of Piero which is the Italian form of Peter meaning "stone, rock" from Greek Petros. It's also an elaborated form of pera, the Italian word for "pear"; it's the name of the heroine in the Italian folktale The Little Girl Sold with the Pears. Origin: Ancient …

Paxton

Paxton comes from an English surname meaning "Pœcc's town", Pœcc being an Old English given name of unknown meaning. The first part of the name, Pax, sounds exactly like the Latin word for "peace" (which was also the name of the Roman goddess of peace), though I'm not sure if it's related to the name or just a …

Polina

Polina is either a Slavic and Greek form of Paulina (the feminine form of Paulinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "small" or "humble" via Latin paulus (little, small) derived from a PIE root word) or it's a Russian diminutive of Apollinariya, the Russian feminine form of Apollinaris which derives from the name of the Greek god Apollo. The name is of uncertain etymology and …

Puck

Puck is the name of a mischievous sprite in English folklore, also known as Robin Goodfellow, and appears in Shakespeare's A Midsummer's Night Dream as a mischievous, clever elf who sets up all the trouble that follows in the play. The name comes from Old English pūca meaning "goblin, demon" via Proto-Germanic *pūkô (goblin, spook) derived from PIE *(s)pāuǵ-, *(s)pāug- …