Irene

Irene comes from Greek Eirene meaning “peace”. In Greek mythology, Eirene is the Greek goddess of peace and the season of the spring, and is one of the Horae/Horai, goddessess of the season and later became assocoiated with order and justice. Although Irene is often pronounced eye-reen in the English-speaking world, it’s also pronounced eye-reen-ee or er-re-ne.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Eirene (Ancient Greek)
  • Irena (Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Dutch, Lithuanian)
  • Irina (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian)
  • Arina (Russian)
  • Irine (Georgian)
  • Iria (Portuguese, Galician)
  • Irenka (Czech and Polish diminutive of Irena)
  • Irène (French)
  • Eirini (Greek)
  • Irini (Modern Greek)
  • Irén (Hungarian)
  • Eireen (Irish)

 

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Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Winifry

Winifry could be a variant form of Winifred, the anglicized form of Welsh given name Gwenfrewi. The first part of the name comes from Welsh gwen meaning “fair, blessed, white” while the second element frewi might mean “reconciliation, peace” so Winifry essentially means “fair peace” or “blessed peace”. However, Winifry could also be a feminine variant form of Winfred, an Old English male name meaning “peaceful friend” from Old English wine (friend) and frið (peace). Winifry has also been used as a surname, originating from the given name.

Origin: Welsh, Old English

Variants:

  • Winifred (Welsh, English)
  • Winnifred (Welsh, English)
  • Gwenfrewi (Welsh)

 

Male forms:

  • Winfred (English)
  • Winfrith (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Winfried (German)

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Izumi

Izumi is a Japanese unisex name though it seems to be more common for women than men. It has a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 泉 “spring, fountain water” (used for both sexes); 一角 “one + corner, edge; horn, antler; character, part, role”; 五巳 “five + sign of the Snake”; 五澄 “five + clear, pure”; 五美 “five + beauty, beautiful”; 泉美 “spring, fountain water + beauty, beautiful”; 泉水 “spring, fountain water + water”; while for men the kanji used is: 一弥 “one + cross, extend over”; 委清 “committee + clear, pure”; and 泉三 “spring, fountain + three”; 和泉 “peace, harmony + spring, fountain water”; though there are other meanings depending on the kanji.

Izumi is also a surname, used with the kanji 泉 “spring, fountain water”, though there could be other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Japanese

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Sol

Sol is the Latin name for “sun”, and the name of the Roman god of the sun as well as being the Spanish and Potuguese word for “sun” deriving from Latin as well. It’s also a short form of Solomon, deriving from Hebrew shalom meaning “peace”. As a surname, it’s seems to have originated from Latin sol.

Spelled Sól, it’s the name of the Norse goddess of the sun; her name means “sun” in Old Norse.

Sol, also spelled as Sul and Seol, is also a Korean surname although I couldn’t manage to find an exact meaning behind it. Sol is also a Korean unisex given name meaning “pine tree” in Hangul; it can be used on its own or as part of a compound name.

Origin: Latin, Hebrew, Old Norse, Korean

Female variants:

  • Sola (f)
  • Sole (Italian, Spanish)

 

솔 (Hangul)– Sol

 

Vadim

Vadim is a Russian male name of unknown meaning. It’s been used as the Russian form of Bademusthe name of a Persian Christian martyr who was killed in Persia and later recognized as a saint. I’ve seen the name as possibly originating from Persian badian meaning “anise, aniseed”. Vadim could also be a short form of Russian Vadimir composed of Slavic elements vaditi (accuse, blame, slander) and miru (peace, world).

Vadim is also a surname which seems to have originated from the given name.

Nicknames: Vadik is the Russiam diminutive of Vadim

Origin: Persian, Slavic

Variants:

  • Vadimir (Russian)

 

Вадим (Russian) Vadim

Manfred

Manfred comes from an Old German name though there seems to be some uncertainty as to the first element of the name. The second element comes from Germanic frid (peace) while the first part of the name either comes from Germanic man (man) or magan (strength) so the name could mean either “strong peace” or “man peace/ peaceful man”.

As well as being a given name, Manfred is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Man, Manny/Mannie, Fred

Origin: Germanic

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Variants:

  • Manfried (German)
  • Manfredo (Italian)
  • Meginfrid (Ancient Germanic)

 

Female forms:

  • Manfreda (also the name of a genus of flowering plants named after the 14th century Italian writer Manfredus de Monte Imperiale)

 

Arina

Arina is a Russian variant of Irina, a cognate of Irene meaning “peace”. Irene (also spelled Eirene) is the goddess of peace in Greek mythology. I’ve also seen it listed as being a feminine form of Arni, an Old Norse name meaning “eagle”.

According to Wikipedia, Arina is also a Kurdish feminine name meaning “flower plain” although I can’t attest to the accuracy of that. If anyone knows more about it, please let me know.

Arina is also a Japanese feminine name with different meanings depending on the kanji used. The meanings are listed below at the end, although it’s possible there are other meanings besides the ones I’ve found. I’ve come across this site that shows all the possible kanji that can be used in a name. I don’t have the time, nor the effort, to look up every kanji for the meaning so I’ve listed the ones I’ve already come across. If anyone is interested in the other possible meanings on the site you’ll have to look it up yourself.

Origin: Greek, Old Norse, Japanese

 

Variants:

  • Irina (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian)
  • Irene (English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek)
  • Eirene (Ancient Greek)

 

*na (奈) is a phonetic character meaning it has no special meaning*

Arina 亜莉奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+jasmine”

Arina 亜利奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+advantegous/profit”

Arina 亜梨奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+pear”

Arina 亜莉菜 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+jasmine+vegetables, greens”

Arina 亜利菜 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+advantegous/profit+vegetables, greens”

Arina 亜梨菜 (Japanese kanj) “second, Asia+pear+vegetables, greens”

 

*I’ve tried very hard to be as accurate as possible but I’m not a native Japanese speaker nor am I in any way fluent in the language, so there might be some mistakes.