Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

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Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Dietrich

Dietrich is a Germanic male name meaning “ruler of the people” or “people ruler” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power, ruler). It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Diederich (German)
  • Theodoric (Latinized form of Dietrich)
  • Theodoricus (Ancient Germanic Latinized)
  • Derek (English)
  • Diederik (Dutch)
  • Dederick (English)
  • Derick (English)
  • Derrick (English)
  • Deryck (English)
  • Theoderich (Ancient Germanic)
  • Thierry (French)
  • Dirk (Dutch, German, English)
  • Teutorigos (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tudor (Welsh)
  • Tudur (Welsh)

 

Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Lydia

Lydia is a Greek female name derived from the name of an ancient kingdom in Asia Minor, used to refer to someone who came from there. It was apparently named after a king, Lydus or Ludos, whose name might mean “beautiful one” or “noble one”. Another possible meaning is that it means “play” or “sport” though that seems sketchy.

Lydos could also be tentatively linked to Proto-Indo-European h₁lewdʰ meaning “people”.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Lidia (Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English)
  • Lyydia (Finnish)
  • Lidiya (Russian, Bulgarian)
  • Lídia (Catalan, Portuguese, Hungarian)
  • Lidija (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Lýdie (Czech)
  • Lýdia (Slovak, Faroese)
  • Lydie (French)
  • Lyda (English)
  • Lidda (English)
  • Lydian (English)
  • Lydiana (English)
  • Lidiana (English)
  • Ludia (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Lydus (Ancient Greek)
  • Lydos (Ancient Greek)
  • Ludos (Ancient Greek)

Leo

Origin: Latin, Germanic

Meaning: Leo comes from Latin word leo meaning “lion”. It’s a constellation representing to the Ancient Greeks the Nemean lion killed by the Greek demigod and hero Herakles (Hercules) as one of his twelve labors.

Leo is also one of the signs of the Zodiac, belonging to those born between July 22nd to August 23rd. Apparently those born under this sign are stubborn, loyal and trustworthy, assured, confident and ambitious, but prone to arrogance, jealousy and bossiness.

Leo is also a nickname for names like Leopold, a Germanic name meaning “bold people” from elements leud (people) and bald (bold), the first part of the name deliberately changed to resemble leo; and Leonard meaning “brave lion” from Germanic levon (lion) and hard (brave, hardy).

Variants:

  • Leon (Greek, Ancient Greek, English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch)
  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Ancient Greek, Latin)
  • Levon (Armenian)
  • Leoš (Czech)
  • Léo (French)
  • Léon (French)
  • Léonce (French form of Leontios)
  • Lionel (French diminutive of Léon; English)
  • Levan (Georgian)
  • Leone (Italian)
  • Leonzio (Italian form of Leontios)
  • Leonas (Lithuanian)
  • Lef (Polish cognate of Lev)
  • Lev (Russian)
  • Leonti (Russian)
  • Leontiy (Russian)
  • Leonty (Russian)
  • Lyov (Russian)
  • León (Spanish)
  • Leoncio (Spanish)