Pan

Pan is the name of a Greek god of the wild, nature, shepherds, and flocks, depicted as a man with the horns, legs, and tail of a goat, and who often played the pan-pipes. His name is somewhat tricky to pin down- it may be related to Greek pan meaning “all”; it could mean “shepherd” or it may come from an old Arcadian word for “rustic”, since Pan’s homeland was Arcadia. However, it’s believed that Pan is a cognate of Pushan, a Hindu god, in charge of the nourishment and protection of cattle; both their names may be from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect, to shepherd). Pan is also a short form of names like Pandora or any name beginning with Pan.

Pan is also a Chinese surname, also common in Korean and Vietnamese, meaning “water in which rice has been rinsed” from the character , though there may be other meanings depending on the character; it’s also a Spanish and Occitan surname meaning “bread” from Latin panis (bread), an occupational name for a baker or a pantryman, as well as a Polish, Ukrainian, and Yiddish surname meaning “lord; master; landowner” from a Slavic word.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European, Chinese, Latin, Slavic

 

 

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Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master).

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek)
  • Martta (Finnish)
  • Marthe (French, Norwegian)
  • Marte (Norwegian)
  • Márta (Hungarian)
  • Morta (Lithuanian)
  • Maata (Maori)
  • Marfa (Russian)

 

August

August is the German, Polish, Catalan, and Scandinavian form of Augustus, originally an Ancient Roman title used by Roman emperors after the first and, by some accounts, greatest emperor of Rome, Gaius Octavius, who was the adopted son and heir of Julius Caesar. It means “majestic”, “venerable”, “great” from Latin augere (to increase). August is also the name of the eighth month of the year. August is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Gus, Auggie

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Augustus (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)
  • Augustinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Aukusti (Finnish)
  • Auguste (French)
  • Augustin (French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German)
  • Augusto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Augusts (Latvian)
  • Augustas (Lithuanian)
  • Augustinas (Lithuanian)
  • Avgust (Russian, Ukrainian, Slovene)
  • Augustine (English)
  • Augustín (Slovak, Czech)
  • Agustí (Catalan)
  • Ágoston (Hungarian)
  • Augustijn (Dutch)
  • Austin (English)
  • Austen (English)
  • Austyn (English)
  • Agostino (Italian)
  • Augustyn (Polish)
  • Agostinho (Portuguese)
  • Avguštin (Slovene)
  • Agustín (Spanish)
  • Awstin (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Augusta (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English, German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish)
  • Auguste (German)
  • Avgusta (Slovene)
  • Augustine (French, German)
  • Augustina (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Agostina (Italian)
  • Augustyna (Polish)
  • Agustina (Spanish)

 

Edward

Edward comes from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, rich) and weard (guard, guardian) meaning “rich guardian”, “rich guard” or “wealthy guard/guardian”. It’s also an surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Ed, Eddy/Eddie, Ted, Teddy, Ned, Lalo (Spanish diminutive of Eduardo), Ede (Hungarian diminutive), Edu (Portuguese diminutive), Dado (Portuguese), Duda (Portuguese)

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Eadweard (Old English)
  • Eduard (German, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Catalan, Dutch, Estonian, Romanian, Georgian, Armenian)
  • Edvard (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Czech, Armenian)
  • Edorta (Basque)
  • Eetu (Finnish)
  • Édouard (French)
  • Ekewaka (Hawaiian)
  • Eduárd (Hungarian)
  • Edvárd (Hungarian)
  • Eadbhárd (Irish)
  • Edoardo (Italian)
  • Eduards (Latvian)
  • Duarte (Portuguese)
  • Eduardo (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Eideard (Scottish)
  • Ned (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Edwarda (English)
  • Edwardine (English)
  • Edwardina (English)
  • Eduarda (Portuguese)

 

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)

 

Wilhelmina

Wilhelmina is the feminine form of Wilhelm, the German cognate of William meaning “willful protection” or “desiring protection” made up from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection”.

Nicknames: Will, Mina, Willie/Willy

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Wilhelmine (German)
  • Wilhelma (German)
  • Wilma (German, Dutch, English)
  • Vilma (Spanish, Hungarian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Coatian)
  • Vilhelmiina (Finnish)
  • Vilhelmina (Lithuanian, Swedish)
  • Willamina (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Wilhelm (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish)
  • William (English)
  • Willem (Dutch)
  • Wilhelmus (Dutch)

 

Rozalia

Rozalia is the Polish and Romanian form of Rosalia, which comes from Late Latin rosa meaning “rose”.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Rozália (Hungarian)
  • Rosalia (Latin, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rosália (Portuguese)
  • Rosalía (Galician, Spanish)
  • Rozalija (Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Rosalie (French)
  • Rozaliya (Russian)

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Gabriel

Gabriel is a male name, from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Gabe

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Female forms:

  • Gabrielle (French, English)
  • Gabriella (Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)
  • Gavriila (Russian)