Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master).

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek)
  • Martta (Finnish)
  • Marthe (French, Norwegian)
  • Marte (Norwegian)
  • Márta (Hungarian)
  • Morta (Lithuanian)
  • Maata (Maori)
  • Marfa (Russian)

 

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Rico

Rico is the Spanish short form of Ricardo, the Spanish and Portuguese form of Richard meaning “brave ruler” or “strong ruler” from Germanic elements ric (power, ruler) and hard (brave, hardy). It’s also the Italian short form of Enrico, the Italian form of Henry which means “home ruler” from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, ruler). Rico is also a surname derived from the Old Portuguese word rico meaning “rich” likely referring to someone whow as rich or powerful; the word comes from Gothic reiks (mighty, powerful) via Proto-Germanic *rīks (kingly, royal; mighty, powerful; rich).

Origin: Germanic

 

 

 

Dario

Dario is the Italian and Croatian form of Darius, the Roman form of Greek Dareios which ultimately comes from Persian Dārayavahush meaning “to possess excellence” or “he who holds firm to good” from dâraya (to possess, to hold) and vahu (good). Dario is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Persian

Variants:

  • Dário (Portuguese)
  • Darío (Spanish)
  • Darius (English, Lithuanian, Romanian)
  • Dareios (Ancient Greek)
  • Darayavahush (Old Persian)
  • Daryawesh (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Darijus (Lithuanian)
  • Dariush (Persian)
  • Daryush (Persian)
  • Dariusz (Polish)

 

Female forms:

  • Daria (Italian, Polish, Romanian, Croatian, Late Greek, English)
  • Dareia (Late Greek)
  • Darija (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Darya (Russian, Belarusian)
  • Darja (Slovene, Czech)
  • Tarja (Finnish)
  • Dariya (Ukrainian)
  • Odarka (Ukrainian)

 

Cadrian

Cadrian seems to be a modern English name, either an elaborated form of Cade, which has a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • being an English surname derived from a metonymic occupational surname for a cooper (someone who made and repaired barrels) which comes from Old French cade (cask, barrel);
  • it could also be from a Medieval English given name, Cada, which comes from a Germanic root word meaning “lump” or “swelling”;
  • it may also be related to Middle English cade referring to a pet or domestic animal that has been abandoned by its mother and reared by hand. The word itself comes from an unknown origin. As a surname it seems to have originated as a nickname for a gentle or inoffensive person;
  • Cade is also another name for the Juniperus oxycedrus (also known as prickly juniper or cade juniper ( from French genévrier cade);
  • Cade is also the Italian third-person singular present meaning “fall” from Latin cadere (fall).

It’s also possible that Cadrian is another form of Adrian, which comes from Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Cadrian also seems to have some use as a surname although

Origin: Old French, Germanic, Middle English, Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Cadrien (English)
  • Adrian (English)
  • Cade (English)
  • Cadrienne (English) f
  • Cadrianne (English) f

 

Irene

Irene comes from Greek Eirene meaning “peace”. In Greek mythology, Eirene is the Greek goddess of peace and the season of the spring, and is one of the Horae/Horai, goddessess of the season and later became assocoiated with order and justice. Although Irene is often pronounced eye-reen in the English-speaking world, it’s also pronounced eye-reen-ee or er-re-ne.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Eirene (Ancient Greek)
  • Irena (Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Dutch, Lithuanian)
  • Irina (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian)
  • Arina (Russian)
  • Irine (Georgian)
  • Iria (Portuguese, Galician)
  • Irenka (Czech and Polish diminutive of Irena)
  • Irène (French)
  • Eirini (Greek)
  • Irini (Modern Greek)
  • Irén (Hungarian)
  • Eireen (Irish)

 

Elder

Elder is a Portuguese male name, a variant of Hélder which either derives its name from a Dutch town called Den Helder possibly meaning “hell’s door” in Dutch, or “hill/hilly grounds”, or it could be a derived from Germanic given name Hulderic meaning “merciful ruler” or “graceful ruler” from Germanic elements hulda (merciful, graceful) and ric (power, rule). Elder is also a surname, originally used to differentiate between two men with the same name (like a father and son) and Elder would refer to the oldest (or senior). As an English word it’s used to refer to someone who is older or who had a higher rank.

Elder also refers to a type of tree as well as a flower deriving from Old English ellærn meaning “elderberry tree”. The elder tree is often depicted in folklore, associated with magic and witchcraft. One such folklore is that if a person cut down an elder tree without permission of the Elder-Mother than it would take revenge upon that person, and that witches tend to congregate under an elder tree.

Origin: Dutch, Germanic, Old English

Male forms:

  • Hélder (Portuguese)
  • Helder (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Eldra (English)

 

Jaime

Jaime is a variant spelling of Jamie, a nickname for James which is the English form of Late Latin Iacomus via Greek Iakobos, which comes from the Hebrew name Ya’aqov (English form Jacob) meaning “holder of the heel” or “supplanter”. Jaime is also the Spanish and Portuguese male form of James though it’s pronounced hie-mee.

Origin: Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Jamie (Scottish, English)
  • Jaymee (English)
  • Jayme (English)
  • Jaimie (English)
  • Jami (English)
  • Jayma (English)

 

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Socorro

Socorro is a Spanish and Portuguese female given name (as well as a Spanish word) meaning “help, relief, succor”. It’s taken from a title of the Virgin Mary (Virgen del Perpetuo Socorro, or Our Lady of Pepertual Succor). It derives from Latin succurrere (to bring aid, run to the rescue). It’s also a place name as well as a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Latin

 

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)