Rico

Rico is the Spanish short form of Ricardo, the Spanish and Portuguese form of Richard meaning “brave ruler” or “strong ruler” from Germanic elements ric (power, ruler) and hard (brave, hardy). It’s also the Italian short form of Enrico, the Italian form of Henry which means “home ruler” from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, ruler). Rico is also a surname derived from the Old Portuguese word rico meaning “rich” likely referring to someone whow as rich or powerful; the word comes from Gothic reiks (mighty, powerful) via Proto-Germanic *rīks (kingly, royal; mighty, powerful; rich).

Origin: Germanic

 

 

 

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Ronald

Ronald is the Scottish form of Ragnvaldr, an Old Norse name meaning “powerful advice” or “counsel ruler” from Old Norse elements regin (advice, counsel) and valdr (power, ruler, leader) and a cogante of Germanic name Reynold. Ronald is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Ron, Ronny/Ronnie

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Raghnall (Irish, Scottish) pr. raynel
  • Ranald (Scottish form of Reynold)R
  • Ragnvaldr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Ragnvald (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Raginald (Ancient Germanic form of Reynold)
  • Reinald (Ancient Germanic form of Reynold)
  • Reinhold (Ancient Germanic form & German form of Reynold)
  • Reinoud (Dutch cogante of Reynold)
  • Reinout (Dutch cognate of Reynold)
  • Reino (Finnish form of Reynold)
  • Renaud (French form of Reynold)
  • Reynaud (French form of Reynold)
  • Rinaldo (Italian form of Reynold)
  • Reinaldo (Spanish & Portuguese form of Reynold)
  • Reynaldo (Spanish & Portuguese form of Reynold)
  • Ronaldo (Portuguese form of Ronald)
  • Rheinallt (Welsh form of Reynold)
  • Reginald (Latinized form of Reynold)
  • Reginaldus (Latinized form of Reynold)

 

Female forms:

  • Ronalda (Scottish)
  • Ronnette (English)
  • Ronette (English)

 

Richard

Richard is a male name made up of Germanic elements ric (power, rule) and hard (brave, hardy) essentially meaning “strong ruler” or “brave ruler”. Shakespeare wrote two history plays based on King Richard II and King Richard III. Richard is also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Richie, Ricky/Rickie, Dick, Dickie/Dicky, Rich

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Ricohard (Ancient Germanic)
  • Ricard (Catalan)
  • Rikard (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Rikhard (Finnish)
  • Riku (Finnish diminutive of Rikhard)
  • Richárd (Hungarian)
  • Risteárd (Irish)
  • Riccardo (Italian)
  • Rihards (Latvian)
  • Ričards (Latvian)
  • Ričardas (Lithuanian)
  • Dicun (Medieval English diminutive of Dick)
  • Ryszard (Polish)
  • Ricardo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rico (Spanish short form of Ricardo)
  • Rihard (Slovene)
  • Rhisiart (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Ricarda (Spanish, German)
  • Riccarda (Italian)
  • Richelle (English)
  • Richardine (English)
  • Rikki (English)

 

Saeran

Saeran seems to be a male name possibly of Irish origin maning “noble” although I’m not sure of the accuracy of that. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Welsh Saer meaning “carpenter, wright” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “Saer the younger” or “little Saer”. There’s a church in Wales called St. Saeran’s Church dedicated to Saint Saeran, a Celtic bishop.

Saeran also seems to be a Korean male name (also spelled Serran) written with Korean hangul meaning “three + that/what is called” or “bird + that/what is called” though it has several meanings in hanja (Korean reading of Chinese characters) with the 세 (se) reading such as:

  • 世 (generation; world; society; lifetime)

  • 稅 (tax; duty)
  • 勢 (power, force; energy; military strength)

  • 歲 (year; age)
  • 細 (fine, thin; slender)
  • 洗 (to wash)
  • 貰 (get; have; obtain)
  • 笹 (bamboo grass)
  • 說 (explain; seek; talk)

and with the 란 (ran): 

  • 欄 (column)
  • 卵 (egg, ovum)
  • 蘭 (orchid)

Origin: Irish, Welsh, Korean

Variants:

  • Serran
  • Seran

 

America

America is a unisex given name usually given in honor of the United States of America. It comes from Italian male name Amerigo, the medieval Italian form of Emmerich, a Germanic male name. While the second element of the name comes from ric (power, rule), the first part of the name is a little more complicated. It could be from Germanic ermen (whole, universal), amal (work, labor), or heim (home). Apparently the name came from Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Amerika (English, German, Dutch)
  • América (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

 

Male forms:

  • Americus (Latin)
  • Amerigo (Italian)
  • Emmerich (Germanic)

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Dietrich

Dietrich is a Germanic male name meaning “ruler of the people” or “people ruler” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power, ruler). It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Diederich (German)
  • Theodoric (Latinized form of Dietrich)
  • Theodoricus (Ancient Germanic Latinized)
  • Derek (English)
  • Diederik (Dutch)
  • Dederick (English)
  • Derick (English)
  • Derrick (English)
  • Deryck (English)
  • Theoderich (Ancient Germanic)
  • Thierry (French)
  • Dirk (Dutch, German, English)
  • Teutorigos (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tudor (Welsh)
  • Tudur (Welsh)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin