Ancient Greek, Animals, Battle/War, Black/Dark, Color, Gaulish/Celtic mythology, L names, Lion, Male, Mythology, Proto-Celtic, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Welsh

Lewis

Lewis is the medieval English form of Louis, the French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Germanic name Ludwig, from Chlodovech, meaning "famous battle" or "famous in battle" from Germanic elements hlud (famous) and wig (war, battle). It could also be used the anglicized form of Lughaidh (Lugaid), derived from Lugh. Lewis is also a surname with two… Continue reading Lewis

C names, Emotion/Feelings, Literature, Love/Beloved, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Cedric

Cedric is a male given name which seems to have been created by Scottish writer and poet Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) for his 1819 novel Ivanhoe. It's possible he based it on a Celtic name, Cerdic, of unknown origin and meaning though it could be related to Brythonic Caratacos which derives from Proto-Brythonic *karɨd (to love) derived from a PIE root word.… Continue reading Cedric

Ancient Greek, Animals, Black/Dark, Color, Gaulish/Celtic mythology, L names, Lion, Male, Mythology, Proto-Celtic, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Welsh

Llewellyn

Llewelyn comes from Welsh Llywelyn, a name of uncertain meaning though it could be the Welsh form of Celtic Lugubelenus, a combination of two names: Lugus and Belenus; Lugus is a Celtic god of commerce and craftsmanship who was equated with the Roman god Mercury. Though the exact origin of his name is unknown, it has been linked to Proto-Indo-European… Continue reading Llewellyn

B names, Female, Male, Old Norse, Proto-Celtic, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Braith

Braith is a name of uncertain meaning though it may be derived from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled, mottled, brindled" derived from Proto-Brythonic *briθ (painted, speckled, variegated) which comes from Proto-Celtic *mrixtos (speckled). Braith is also a surname likely derived from the given name though it may be related to Old Norse breiðr meaning "broad". Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Brayth (English)  

K names, Male, Nature, Proto-Celtic, Surname names

Keith

Keith comes from a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning though it may be derived from Proto-Brythonic word *koɨd meaning "wood, forest", ultimately from a Proto-Celtic origin. The name may have come from an ancient Germanic tribe known as the Catti who came to Scotland in the 11th century to help the native population defend themselves against the… Continue reading Keith