Gladiolus

Gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers that have sword-shaped leaves and brightly colored flowers. The name comes from Latin gladiolus meaning "little sword, sword lily" which is a diminutive of gladius (sword) which derives from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) via Proto-Celtic *kladiwos  (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Gladio (Italian, Latin) Gladius (Latin)  

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Connor

Connor is the anglicized form of Gaelic Conchobhar meaning "lover of hounds" from Old Irish con (dog, hound) which derives from Proto-Celtic *kū (dog; wolf) derived from PIE *ḱwṓ (dog); and cobar (desiring) also derived from a PIE root word. Connor is also a surname derived from the given name. In Irish myth, Conchobhar mac Nessa was a legendary king of Ulster who was responsible for … Continue reading Connor

Artio

Artio is the name of a Gaulish goddess of bears. Her name comes from Celtic *artos meaning "bear" derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear). Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Alba

Alba is a female given name which has a few different meanings and etymologies: it's a feminine form of Albus, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright". The name may be derived from Latin albus meaning “white, bright, clear” from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white); Alba may also be derived from Germanic element alb meaning "elf" from Proto-Germanic *albiz (elf, fairy) which ultimately derives from the same … Continue reading Alba

Hector

Hector is the name of the Trojan hero, the son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba, and the husband of Andromache. He was the most beloved warrior in Troy and considered noble, virtuous, and dutiful. Hector was killed by Achilles and his body dragged around by a chariot (though his body was preserved by Apollo … Continue reading Hector

Alan

Alan is a male name of uncertain etymology which may possibly mean "little rock" or "noble" from Old Irish ail. It also means "beautiful, handsome" from Scottish Gaelic àlainn (beautiful, fine, splendid). Alan may also be derived from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, which may be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti meaning "to nourish, grow" from Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂el- (to grow, … Continue reading Alan

Caledon

Caledon seems to be a shortened form of Caledonia, the old Latin name for Scotland in the northern part of Britain. Apparently the name is derived from a Pictish tribe in northern Scotland called the Caledonii which could be related to Proto-Celtic word *kaletos- meaning "hard/hardy, tough" from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard), perhaps in reference to the rocky land … Continue reading Caledon

Erin

Erin is the Anglicized form of Éireann (from which the name of Ireland comes from) derived from Gaelic Éire which comes from Old Irish Ériu meaning "fertile" or "fat, rich" likely in reference to the land, so connoting the idea of "abundant land" or "fat land", from Proto-Celtic *Φīwerjon, derived from Proto-Indo-European *piHwerjon from *piHwer meaning "fat". Though Erin seems to be very popular … Continue reading Erin