Caro

Caro (pr. care-oh) is usually used as a short form of Caroline or Carolyn or any names beginning with caro-, both of which derive from Germanic Karl from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a free man. Caro may also be a … Continue reading Caro

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Lukius

Lukius is a variant of Loukios, an Ancient Roman given name meaning "light" from Latin lux. The name derives from Proto-Italic *louks (light) from Proto-Indo-European root word *lewk- (white; light; bright; to shine). Also spelled Lucius though the Ancient Romans pronounced the c like a k. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Lucius (Ancient Roman, English) Loukios (Ancient Roman) Lucio (Italian) Lucjusz (Polish) Lúcio (Portuguese) Lucio (Spanish)   Female … Continue reading Lukius

Astin

Astin is an English surname, a contraction of Anglo-Norman given name Asketin, itself a diminutive of Old Norse Ásketill made up of Old Norse elements áss (god) derived from Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity) from a Proto-Indo-European root word, and ketill (cauldron, helmet) from Proto-Germanic *katilaz (kettle, bucket, vessel) which may have been derived from Latin catillus (small bowl, dish) which comes from Proto-Italiac *katinos-, so the name essentially means "god's … Continue reading Astin

Maris

Maris is a female name taken from Latin meaning "of the sea" from Latin mare (sea) derived from Proto-Italic *mari (sea) from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). It comes from the Latin title stella maris "star of the sea" used for the Virgin Mary. Maris may also come from Latin mās meaning "male". Maris is also the name of an Etruscan god of agriculture and fertility, his … Continue reading Maris

Fiora

Fiora is derived from Italian fiore meaning "flower" which is derived from Latin florem via Proto-Italic *flōs (flower, blossom) via Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (bloom, flower). Spelled Fíora it becomes an Irish word meaning "true" which comes from Old Irish fír (true, correct, real). Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old Irish Variants: Fiore (Italian) unisex Fíora (Old Irish) Fiorella (Italian)   Male forms: Fiore (Italian) Fír (Old Irish) Fíor (Old … Continue reading Fiora