Rose

Rose is the name of a flower which derives from Latin rosa meaning “rose” via Greek rhodon (rose) which may ultimately be derived from Persian *wrda- (rose), though it may also derive from Proto-Indo-European *wṛdho- meaning “sweetbriar”. Rose was also originally the Norman form of Germanic names beginning with hrod meaning “fame”, originally spelled Rohese or Roese. Rose is also a short form of names like Rosamund, Rosaline or Rosalind, in which case the first part of the name comes from Germanic hros meaning “horse”. Rose is also a surname, derived as a place name for someone who lived near where roses grew or as a nickname for someone with a rosy complexion.

Origin: Persian, Proto-Indo-European, Germanic

Variants:

  • Rosa (Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English)
  • Roza (Ancient Germanic, Russian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
  • Rosalia (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman)
  • Rozalia (Polish, Romanian)
  • Rosalie (French, German, Dutch, English)
  • Rosalee (English)
  • Rosamund (English)
  • Rosalind (English)
  • Rosaline (English)
  • Rosie (English)

 

Advertisements

Roya

Roya is a Persian female name meaning “dream, vision” which comes from Arabic r-ʾ-y 

(ر ء ي), related to seeing with one’s eyes.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Röya (Turkish)
  • Rüya (Turkish)

 

رویا (Persian)

 

Ruth

Ruth is a Hebrew female name of uncertain origin though the most popular theory is that it is linked to Hebrew re’ut meaning “companion” or “friend”, though other possible theories include: “refreshment”, “appearance, beauty”, and “pasture”. Ruth may also be related to Middle English word ruthe or reuth meaning “pity, compassion”, “sorrow, grief” derived from Old Norse hryggð (sorrow, grief). Ruth is also a Limburgish short form of Rutger, the Dutch form of Roger meaning “famous spear” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and ger (spear). Ruth is also a surname.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse, Germanic

Variants:

  • Ruthie (English)
  • Rut (Swedish, Spanish, Icelandic, Hebrew)
  • Routh (Greek)
  • Ruut (Finnish)
  • Rūta (Lithuanian)
  • Ruta (Polish)
  • Rute (Portuguese)
  • Ruf (Russian)

 

Rosaire

Rosaire is a French male name meaning “rosary” as well as also the French word for rosary. It comes from Latin rosarium meaning “rose garden” from rosa (rose) and arium (place for). It seems to have been very rare as a given name, and in spite of being a French male name Rosaire also seems to have some use as a feminine name as well.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Rosario (Spanish, Italian) u
  • Rosaria (Italian) f
  • Rosário (Portuguese)
  • Roser (Catalan) f

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Rachelle

Rachelle (pr. either as ray-chel or ra-shel) is a variant spelling of Rachel, a Hebrew female name meaning “ewe”. In the Old Testament, Rachel is the beautiful younger sister of Leah, both of them married to Jacob, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Rachel (English, Hebrew, German, French, Dutch)
  • Rachael (English)
  • Racheal (English)
  • Rachyl (English)
  • Raschelle (English)
  • Rahel (Biblical Latin)
  • Rakel (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic)
  • Raakel (Finnish)
  • Ráhel (Finnish)
  • Ráichéal (Irish)
  • Rachele (Italian)
  • Raquel (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rahela (Romanian, Serbian)
  • Ruchel (Yiddish)

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)