Arthur

Arthur is the name of the legendary king of the Arthurian legends, the king of the Britons who defended against Saxon invaders. The meaning behind the name is unknown though it has often been linked to Celtic *artos meaning “bear” combined with rīxs meaning “king” meaning “bear king” or gwr (man) meaning “bear man”. The name may also be related to Artorius, a rare Roman family name of unknown etymology and meaning. Arthur is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Celtic

Variants:

  • Arturo (Italian, Spanish)
  • Artur (Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Polish, Russian, German, Estonian, Swedish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Artturi (Finnish)
  • Artúr (Hungarian)
  • Artūrs (Latvian)
  • Artūras (Lithunanian)
  • Artair (Scottish)

 

Female forms:

  • Arthuria (English)
  • Arthurina (English)
  • Arthurine (English, French)

 

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Seraiah

Seraiah is a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh is ruler” or “Soldier/Prince of the Lord” and is the name of several figures in the Bible. Although a legitimate male name, it does have potential as a female name as well.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Seriah
  • Serayah (English)

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Mythili

Mythili is an Indian female name likely meaning “princess of Mithila”, Mithila being the name of a kingdom in which she was found. Mithila seems to mean “soil”. It was an epithet of Sita, the name of a Hindu goddess in the Rigveda as well as also being the name of the wife of Rama (who was the avatar of the god Vishnu), who was also the avatar of the goddess Lakshmi (who was the goddess of wealth and wife of Vishnu). Sita was found abandoned as a baby in a furrow, which is why she is referred to as the daughter of the mother goddess Bhumi-Devi, and was adopted by King Janaka of Mithila. Siva and Rama’s story is told in the Ramayana, an ancient Indian epic poem about Rama and wife Siva, who is abducted by the demon king Ravana, and she represents the ideal virtues and qualities a woman should have.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Mythily
  • Maithili

 

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Zebulon

Zebulon is a name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Ugartic zbl meaning “prince”, linked to the same root word as Jezebel meaning “where is the prince?” or “not exalted”. Zebulon may originally have been used as an epithet for the god Ba’al. Other theories of the name link to Hebrew zabal meaning “to exalt, to honor”; zeved “gift, dowry”; or “dwelling”. Zebulon is the name of the youngest son of Jacob and Leah in the Bible and the Torah, as well as the founder of the Tribe of Zebulon.

Nicknames: Zeb

Origin: Ugartic, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Zebulun (Biblical)
  • Zaboulon (Biblical Greek)
  • Zevulun (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Zabulon (Biblical Latin)