Vladimir

Vladimir comes from Slavic element vladeti meaning "to rule" (derived from Proto-Indo-European *wal "to be strong") combined with meru (great, famous) essentially meaning "great ruler" or "famous ruler". However, the second element has also been associated with miru (peace, world) so the name could also mean "peaceful ruler" or "world ruler". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Waldomar (Ancient Germanic) Valdimárr (Ancient Scandinavian) Uladzimir (Belarusian) Vladimír … Continue reading Vladimir

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Albert

Albert comes from Germanic Adalbert meaning "noble bright" from Germanic elements adal (noble) derived from Proto-Germanic *aþalaz (noble) and and beraht (bright, famous) derived from Proto-Indo-European root word *bhereg- (to shine). Albert is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Al, Albie, Bert, Bertie Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European Variants: Adalbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish) Adalberht (Ancient Germanic) Albertus (Latin, Dutch) Adelbert (German, Dutch) Albrecht (German) … Continue reading Albert

Agafya

Agafya is the Russian form of Agatha which comes from Greek agathos meaning "good". Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Agata (Russian, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian) Águeda (Spanish, Portuguese) Agatha (English, Ancient Greek) Agathe (Ancient Greek, French, German, Norwegian, Danish) Agáta (Czech) Ágota (Hungarian) Ågot (Norwegian) Águeda (Spanish, Portuguese) Agda (Swedish)   Male forms: Agaton (Russian) Agafon (Russian) … Continue reading Agafya

Svetlana

Svetlana is a Slavic female name meaning "light" which comes from Russian svet (light) derived from Proto-Slavic *svě̑tъ (light; world) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweytos (bright; white). Nicknames: Lana, Sveta Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Svjetlana (Croatian, Serbian) Světlana (Czech) Svitlana (Ukrainian) Svetlina (Bulgarian)  

Dmitri

Dmitri is the Russian form of Demetrios, a Greek male name meaning "belonging to Demeter", Demeter being the name of the Greek goddess of agriculture. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, the second element of the name is from Greek meter meaning “mother”. The first part of the name is a little tricky. It could be … Continue reading Dmitri

Mark

Mark is the English form of Marcus, an Ancient Roman name which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. … Continue reading Mark

Valerian

Valerian comes from Roman cognomen Valerianus which comes from Latin valeo meaning "to be healthy, strong", derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). Valerian is also the name of a flower and an herb, as well as a surname originating from the given name. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Valerius (Ancient Roman) Valerianus (Ancient Roman) Valérian (French) Valère (French) Walerian (Polish) … Continue reading Valerian

Aksinya

Aksinya is a variant form of Kseniya, the Russian form of Xenia, a Greek female name meaning “hospitality” from Greek xenos (foreigner, guest). In ancient Greece, xenia was the Greek concept of hospitality towards strangers or friends. It was even an important aspect to the Greek gods, one of the epithets accorded to the god Zeus being Zeus Xenios, the protector … Continue reading Aksinya

Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning "moist, tender, delicate" or "calling", as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning "hope". Origin: Arabic, Slavic Variants: Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic) Nadiya (Ukrainian) Nadja (German, Slovene) Nadiyya (Arabic) Nadiye (Turkish) Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)   نديّة (Arabic) "moist, tender, … Continue reading Nadia

Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear". Origin: Slavic   Variants: Myla (English) Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish) Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian) Miléna … Continue reading Mila