Aksinya

Aksinya is a variant form of Kseniya, the Russian form of Xenia, a Greek female name meaning “hospitality” from Greek xenos (foreigner, guest). In ancient Greece, xenia was the Greek concept of hospitality towards strangers or friends. It was even an important aspect to the Greek gods, one of the epithets accorded to the god Zeus being Zeus Xenios, the protector of guests and the patron of hospitality who will avenge any wrongdoing done to guests by their hosts.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Xenia (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenia (English form of Xenia)
  • Oxana (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Oksana ((Ukrainian, Russian)
  • Kseniya (Russian)
  • Ksenija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene)
  • Senja (Finnish)
  • Ksenia (Polish)

 

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Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning “moist, tender, delicate” or “calling”, as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning “hope”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic

Variants:

  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadja (German, Slovene)
  • Nadiyya (Arabic)
  • Nadiye (Turkish)
  • Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)

 

نديّة (Arabic) “moist, tender, delicate”

نادية (Arabic) “calling”

 

Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning “gracious, dear”.

Origin: Slavic

 

Variants:

  • Myla (English)
  • Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian)
  • Miléna (Hungarian)
  • Milica (Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Ludmila (Czech, Russian)
  • Camilla (English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman)
  • Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Milagros (Spanish)

 

Male forms:

  • Milan (Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch)
  • Milen (Bulgarian)
  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miloš (Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Mile (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Miloje (Serbian)

 

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Lana

Lana is an Arabic female name deriving from a root word meaning “soft, tender, gentle”. It’s also a short form of names like Svetlana, a Slavic female name meaning “light” from Slavic svet (light), or Alana, feminine form of Alan, a Celtic name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to meaning either “little rock” or “handsome” though it might also be related to Alaunus, a Gaulish god of healing and prophecy whose name could be related to Proto-Celtic *al(aun) meaning “nourishing” or *alo meaning “feed, raise, nurture” or possibly meaning “shining one”.

Lana is also a Hawaiian name meaning “calm as still waters” or “afloat”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic, Celtic, Hawaiian

 

لانا (Arabic)

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Nika

Nika is a unisex given name with several possible meanings. It’s a Russian short form of Veronika which ultimately comes from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringer of victory, bringing victory”, or any name ending in -nika, as well as also being a short form of Nikita, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning “winner, victor”. Nika is also the feminine form of male given name Nikola, the Slavic form of Nicholas “victory of the people”, as well as also being the (male) dimininutive of Nikoloz, the Georgian form of Nicholas.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nica (Spanish, Swedish)

 

Nikita

Nikita is a Russian male name, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning “winner, victor”, or from Greek Aniketos meaning “unconquerable”. It’s also an Indian female name originating from a completely different source, from Sanskrit niketa meaning “house, habitation”.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Sanskrit

Female variants:

  • Niketa (Indian, Marathi, Hindi)

 

Male variants:

  • Mykyta (Ukrainian)
  • Mikita (Belarusian)
  • Niketas (Ancient Greek)
  • Aniketos (Ancient Greek)

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Ksenia

Ksenia is the Polish form of Xenia, a Greek female name meaning “hospitality” from Greek xenos (foreigner, guest). In ancient Greece, xenia was the Greek concept of hospitality towards strangers or friends. It was even an important aspect to the Greek gods, one of the epithets accorded to the god Zeus being Zeus Xenios, the protector of guests and the patron of hospitality who will avenge any wrongdoing done to guests by their hosts.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Xenia (Ancient Greek)
  • Xene (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenia (English form of Xenia)
  • Oxana (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Kseniya (Russian)
  • Aksinya (Russian)
  • Ksenija (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene)
  • Senja (Finnish)
  • Oksana (Ukrainian)