Dava

Dava is the Scottish feminine form of David, a Hebrew male name meaning “beloved”. Dava is also the name of a Geto-Dacian city used as a suffix for any town, city, or fortress which may be derived from PIE *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set), as well as also being a word in Turkish meaning “case, lawsuit, trial”. Origin:…

Lilias

Lilias is the Scottish form of Lillian, an English female name which may have originally come about as one of the numerous nicknames for Elizabeth which derives from Hebrew meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”, although it’s also likely that it could be related as another form of Lily. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Lileas (Scottish)…

Ewan

Ewan (pr. yoo-an) is a Scottish male name, an anglicized form of Eoghan, a name of uncertain meaning though possibly meaning “of the yew tree” or “born of the yew tree” though I’ve also seen it as possibly being derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning “youth”. Another possible origin for Eoghan is from Celtic Esugenios meaning “good born” derived from Proto-Celtic *esus (good) derived…

Lindsey

Lindsey is a varint spelling of Lindsay, an English unisex name which originated as an English and Scottish surname derived from a region in Lincolnshire, England. It means “Lincoln‘s island” from Old English. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Male forms: Lindsay (English, Scottish)   Female forms: Lindsey (English, Scottish) Linsey (English) Lyndsay (English) Lyndsey (English) Lynsey (English) Lindsie (English) Linsay…

Clyde

Clyde is an English male name of uncertain etymology. It derives from the River Clyde in Scotland though it could be derived from a Celtic word meaning “cleansing”. It may also have gotten its name from the name of a Celtic goddess, Clota, who ruled over the River Clyde in Scotland. Origin: uncertain, perhaps Celtic Variants:…

Iona

Iona is a female given name, derived from the name of an island located off Scotland. The origin of the name is uncertain though it could be derived from Old Norse ey meaning “island” though it could also be related to a Proto-Celtic source meaning “yew”. It’s just as possible that Iona may be a variant form…

Blaire

Blaire comes from a Scottish surname meaning “plain”, “field”, “battlefield” derived from Scottish Gaelic blàr (plain, field, battlefield). Origin: Gaelic Variants: Blair (Scottish, English) Blayr (English) Blare (English)  

Hope

Hope is a virtue name expressing the attitude, desire or belief that something good or wished for will happen. It comes from Old English hopa, hopian which derives from a PIE root word. Hope is also a Scottish and English surname derived from a habitational name for someone who lived in a small, enclosed valley; it derives…

Gus

Gus is often used as a short form of names such as:  August, derived from Augustus meaning “great”, “venerable”, “majestic”; Gustavo (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian) and Gustav (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German) both deriving from Slavic Gostislav meaning “guest glory” from Proto-Slavic *gȏstь (guest) and slava (glory); Angus, the anglicized form of Scottish Aonghus either meaning “one choice” or “one strength, vigor, force”; the first element of the name comes from…

Kier

Kier (pr. keer) comes from a Scottish surname, a variant spelling of Kerr, a topographical surname for someone who lived near a patch of wet ground overgrown with brushwood. It comes from Old Norse kjarr meaning “brushwood” or “thicket, scrub”. Kier could also be the anglicized form of Irish ceàrr meaning “left; incorrect, wrong” or from Old Irish ciar meaning “black, dark”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European…

Dove

Dove is the name of a bird hat symbolizes peace and innocence. It comes from Old English *dūfe (dove; pigeon) from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ. It may be derived from a PIE root word either relating to a word meaning “dive” in reference to its flight or from PIE *dʰewbʰ- (to whisk; smoke; make obscure). Dove is also the past tense of dive meaning…

Lamont

Lamont comes from a Scottish surname which derives from Old Norse given name Logmaðr meaning “law man” made up from Old Norse log, the plural of lag (law) derived from Old Norse leggja (to lay, to put, to place) from Proto-Germanic *lagjaną (to lay, place) derived from a PIE root word; and maðr (man) which also derives from a PIE root word. Lamont may also have…

Ian

Ian is the Scottish form of John which is the English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of Greek Ioannes from Hebrew Yochanan meaning “Yahweh is gracious”. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Iain (Scottish) Eoin (Irish, Scottish) John (English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian) Sean (Irish, English) Ían (Icelandic)  

Leslie

Leslie is a unisex given name derived from a Scottish surname via a place name, Lesslyn, a name of uncertain origin though it may derive from Gaelic leas celyn meaning “holly garden” or “place of the holly trees”. Origin: Gaelic Variants: Lesley (English) Lesly (English) Lesleigh (English)  

Malcolm

Malcolm is a male name, the anglicized form of Scottish Máel Coluim meaning “servant of St. Columba”, referring to someone who followed Irish abbot and missionary St. Columba who spread Christianity into Scotland. Máel means “servant, devout follower” when combined with a name element (as a word it also means “bald, shaved, tonsured”) combined with given name Coluim, the Gaelic…

Gordan, Gordon

Gordan originates from South Slavic  gord meaning “dignified” or”proud” from Proto-Slavic good. The name is pronounced gor-dahn. Spelled Gordon (pr. gor-den), it’s a Scottish surname derived from a place name meaning “spacious fort” from Welsh elements gor (spacious) and din (fort) though it may also come from Old English meaning “mud hill” or “dirty hill”. Another possible etymology of Gordon is from Gallo-Roman…

Blaine

Blaine comes from a Scottish surname meaning “yellow” from Bláán, a diminutive of blá (yellow), perhaps derived as a nickname for someone who had a sallow complexion. It’s also a shortened form of MacBlain meaning “son of Blain” or Mac Gille Blaan meaning “son of the servant of (St.) Blaan”. Blain is also an English word referring to a skin swelling or sore,…

Greer

Greer comes from a Scottish surname which derives from the given name Gregor meaning “watchful, vigilant, alert; to be awake” from Ancient Greek grígoros (quick, fast, swift). Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Grier (Scottish, English) Gregor (Scottish, German, Slovak, Slovene)  

Connor

Connor is the anglicized form of Gaelic Conchobhar meaning “lover of hounds” from Old Irish con (dog, hound) which derives from Proto-Celtic *kū (dog; wolf) derived from PIE *ḱwṓ (dog); and cobar (desiring) also derived from a PIE root word. Connor is also a surname derived from the given name. In Irish myth, Conchobhar mac Nessa was a legendary king of Ulster who was responsible for…

Fingal

Fingal is the anglicized form of Fionnghall, a Scottish Gaelic name meaning “white stranger” from Gaelic elements fionn (white, fair) via Proto-Celtic *windos (white) and gall (stranger) via Old Irish gall (stranger, foreigner) which comes from Latin Gallus meaning “Gaul”, referring to someone who came from there though it later came to mean “foreigner” from a Proto-Indo-European source. Nicknames: Fin Origin: Proto-Celtic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Fionnghall…