Edna

Edna is a female name which comes from two different sources: the first is that it's a Hebrew name meaning "pleasure" or "delight"; it's also an anglicized form of Eithne, a Gaelic modern form of Old Irish Ethniu meaning "kernel, grain". In Irish mythology, Ethniu is the daughter of Balor, king of the Fomorians, a supernatural race sometimes depicted as … Continue reading Edna

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Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan

Logan

Logan comes from a Scottish surname meaning "little hollow" from Gaelic lag (hollow) with the diminutive suffix -an. Logan may also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Leocháin meaning "descendant of Leochán",  the latter of unknown meaning. Origin: Gaelic

Bonnie

Bonnie comes from the Scottish word bonnie meaning "pretty, beautiful" which derives from Middle French bonne (good) from Latin bonus ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European *dew- (to show favor; revere). Origin: Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Bonny (English)  

Kenneth

Kenneth is the anglicized form of two Gaelic names: Coinneach which derives from Gaelic caoin meaning "handsome, fair, beautiful, kind"; and Cináed meaning "born of fire". Kenneth is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Ken, Kenny Origin: Gaelic Variants: Coinneach (Scottish) Cináed (Scottish, Irish) Kennith (English) Kennet (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) Cainneach (Irish) Cionaodh (Irish) Cinioch (Irish) Ciniod … Continue reading Kenneth

Graham

Graham comes from a Scottish surname originally derived from an English place name, Grantham. The second part of the name comes from Old English ham meaning "homestead) while the first part of the name is uncertain. It may be based on a personal name Granta meaning "Granta's homestead", Granta being a name of unknown meaning though it could be derived from Old … Continue reading Graham

Wallace

Wallace comes from a Scottish and English surname meaning "Welsh" or "foreigner" from Norman French word waleis (foreign), originally used to refer to someone who was a Welshman or who lived at the border between England and Wales. Nicknames: Wally/Wallie Origin: Norman French Variants: Wallis (English) Walleis Waleis  

Gavin

Gavin is a medieval form of Gawain, a name of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Welsh Gwalchgwyn meaning "white hawk" from Old Welsh elements gwalch (hawk) and gwyn (white). Another possible origin for the name is from Welsh Gwalchmei meaning  "hawk of May" from Old Welsh gwalch (hawk) and mei (May). The name may also be derived from an early Brittonic name, *Ualcos Magesos meaning "hawk of … Continue reading Gavin

Fiona

Fiona seems to have first been coined by Scottish poet James Macpherson who based it on the Fianna, the name of a group of warriors in Irish mythology, or as the feminine form of Fionn. The name comes from Old Irish finn meaning "fair, blond, white" from Proto-Celtic *windos- (white). Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Fionna (English, Scottish)   Male forms: Fionn … Continue reading Fiona

Keith

Keith comes from a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning though it may be derived from Proto-Brythonic word *koɨd meaning "wood, forest", ultimately from a Proto-Celtic origin. The name may have come from an ancient Germanic tribe known as the Catti who came to Scotland in the 11th century to help the native population defend themselves against the … Continue reading Keith