Ronald

Ronald is the Scottish form of Ragnvaldr, an Old Norse name meaning “powerful advice” or “counsel ruler” from Old Norse elements regin (advice, counsel) and valdr (power, ruler, leader) and a cogante of Germanic name Reynold. Ronald is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Ron, Ronny/Ronnie

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Raghnall (Irish, Scottish) pr. raynel
  • Ranald (Scottish form of Reynold)R
  • Ragnvaldr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Ragnvald (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Raginald (Ancient Germanic form of Reynold)
  • Reinald (Ancient Germanic form of Reynold)
  • Reinhold (Ancient Germanic form & German form of Reynold)
  • Reinoud (Dutch cogante of Reynold)
  • Reinout (Dutch cognate of Reynold)
  • Reino (Finnish form of Reynold)
  • Renaud (French form of Reynold)
  • Reynaud (French form of Reynold)
  • Rinaldo (Italian form of Reynold)
  • Reinaldo (Spanish & Portuguese form of Reynold)
  • Reynaldo (Spanish & Portuguese form of Reynold)
  • Ronaldo (Portuguese form of Ronald)
  • Rheinallt (Welsh form of Reynold)
  • Reginald (Latinized form of Reynold)
  • Reginaldus (Latinized form of Reynold)

 

Female forms:

  • Ronalda (Scottish)
  • Ronnette (English)
  • Ronette (English)

 

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Locke

Locke comes from a surname of several origins and meanings such as:

  • an English, Dutch, and German surname derived from a place name called Lock, referring to someone who lived near an enclosure or a barrier on a river such as a bridge which could be open and closed at will;
  • it could also be an occupational surname used to refer to a locksmith or a lock-keeper from Old English loc meaning “fastening, lock”;
  • Locke could also have come about as a nickname for someone with curly hair from Old English locc via Proto-Germanic *luka (to bend; turn);
  • I’ve also seen it listed as a romanization of Lok, which is the Cantonese pronunciation of Chinese surname Luo meaning “white horse; camel” with the character 駱 or 骆;
  • it might also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname O’Lochlainn meaning “son of Lochlainn”, Lochlainn being the Irish form of Lachlan, originally a Scottish nickname used to refer to someone who was from Norway; Lochlainn means “land of the lochs”.

Locke also connotes the idea of closing or fastening something shut, as well as referring to a lock of hair.

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Chinese

Variants:

  • Lock (English)
  • Lokk (English)
  • Lok (Cantonese, English)

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Eliot

Eliot comes from an English surname, originally used as a medieval pet-form of Elias, a cognate of Elijah, a Hebrew male name meaning “my God is Yahweh” or “Yahweh is my God”.

However, Elliott as a surname might come from an entirely different source: it could be derived from a Middle English male personal name, Athelgeat, meaning “noble Geat”, composed from Middle English athel (noble) and Geat, the name of a North Germanic tribe in southern Sweden. It might also be from Athelgyth, a Middle English female name meaning “noble battle” from Middle English athel (noble) and gyð (war, battle), or from Aelfweald meaning “elf ruler”. It might also be an Anglicized form of Gaelic eileach meaning “dam, mound, bank”.

I listed Eliot as a unisex name- some people might disagree with that and argue it’s a boy’s name and I’m not going to argue against that. But as a fan of the tv show Scrubs, I guess I’ve been able to see it as both.

Origin: Hebrew, Middle English

Variants:

  • Elliott (English)
  • Elliot (English)
  • Eliott (English)
  • Elyot (English)
  • Eliette

 

Maxwell

Maxwell comes from a Scottish surname meaning “Mack’s stream”, Mack possibly being a form of Magnus, a given name derived from Latin meaning “great”, combined with Old English wella (stream). Mack could also be derived from Gaelic mac (son); Macca might also be derived from Old Norse makr “easy to deal with”.

Nicknames: Max

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

David

David comes from a Hebrew male name meaning “beloved”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Dave, Davey/Davie/Davi

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dávid (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Dovid (Yiddish)
  • Daud (Arabic, Indonesian)
  • Dawud (Arabic)
  • Dawood (Arabic)
  • Dawid (Polish, Biblical Hebrew)
  • Daveth (Cornish)
  • Taavet (Estonian)
  • Taavetti (Finnish)
  • Davit (Georgian)
  • Daviti (Georgian)
  • Dáibhí (Irish)
  • Dàibhidh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Daividh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Davi (Portuguese Brazilian)
  • Davide (Italian)
  • Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • Davud (Persian)
  • Dafydd (Welsh)
  • Dewi (Welsh)
  • Dewydd (Old Welsh)
  • Davíd (Icelandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Davina (English)
  • Davena (English)
  • Davinia (English)
  • Davida (English)

Glenn

Glenn comes from a Scottish surname meaning “valley” from Gaelic gleann, originally used to refer to someone who lived near a valley.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Glen (English, Scottish)
  • Glyn (Welsh)
  • Glynn (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Glenna (English, Scottish)
  • Glenne (English)

 

Aiden

Origin: Irish

Meaning: Aiden is a variant spelling of Aidan, which is the Anglicized form of Aodhán from Old Irish Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (or Aodh) with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “fire” or “fiery” so Aiden would mean “little fire” or “little fiery one”.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pronounced ae like hay) is one of the sons of Lir, the twin brother of Fionnuala, and brother of Conn and Fiachra (also twins) who were cursed to be swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother.

Variants:

  • Aidan (Irish, Scottish, English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (English, Irish)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)