Peyton

Peyton comes from an English surname meaning "Pæga's town" or "Pæga settlement". The second element comes from Old English tun (enclosure, settlement) while the first part of the name comes from a given name of unknown meaning. Origin: Old English Variants: Payton (English)  

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Graham

Graham comes from a Scottish surname originally derived from an English place name, Grantham. The second part of the name comes from Old English ham meaning "homestead) while the first part of the name is uncertain. It may be based on a personal name Granta meaning "Granta's homestead", Granta being a name of unknown meaning though it could be derived from Old … Continue reading Graham

Carroll

Carroll comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Cearbhall which may derived from Gaelic cearbh meaning "hacking", which may have been a byname for a butcher or a fierce warrior. Carroll could also be a variant spelling of Carol, either a shortened form of Caroline which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, though Carol is also an English word meaning "joyful … Continue reading Carroll

Warren

Warren comes from an English surname with a few possible origins: it could be derived from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" or "game park" possibly originating from Gaulish *varenna (enclosed area) from *varros (stick, post); it may also refer to someone who lived near a game park; it may be derived from a town called La Varenne in Normandy, France; … Continue reading Warren

Locke

Locke comes from a surname of several origins and meanings such as: an English, Dutch, and German surname derived from a place name called Lock, referring to someone who lived near an enclosure or a barrier on a river such as a bridge which could be open and closed at will; it could also be an … Continue reading Locke

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning "ash tree town", composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement). Origin: Old English Variants: Asheton  

Wynstan

Wynstan is a variant spelling of Wynnstan, an Old English name meaning "joy stone" from elements wynn (joy) and stan (stone). It could also be a variant spelling of Winston, which could either be derived from Wynnstan, or else it derives from the name of a town made up from Old English wine/win (friend) and tun (settlement) meaning "friend's settlement" or "Wine's settlement", Wine being a personal given … Continue reading Wynstan

Gerda

Gerda is the feminine form of Dutch and German given name Gerd, a short form of Gerhard, the Scandinavian form of Gerard meaning "brave spear, hardy spear" from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy). Gerda is also the name of a Norse goddess and jotunn (giant) in Norse mythology, the wife of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse garðr meaning "protection, fenced-in, … Continue reading Gerda

Dayton

Dayton comes from an English surname, a locational surname made up from Old English elements  dic (ditch, dike) and tun (enclosure, settlement) meaning "settlement by the ditch" or "settlement surrounded by a dike", originally referring to someone who lived near such a place. Origin: Old English Variants: Deighton Deaton Dyton