Yardley

Yardley comes from an English surname, originating as a locational name for someone who came from a place called Yardley. The name is made up either from Old English gerd, gyrd (stick, rod; unit of measurement) or Old English geard (enclosure; yard, garden) combined with lēah (wood, woodland, clearing, meadow), so the name would essentially mean "enclosed woodland" or …

Garth

Garth comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who lived near an enclosure. It comes from Old Norse garðr (fence, wall; enclosed space) derived from a PIE root word. Origin: Proto-Indo-European      

Renton

Renton comes from a Scottish surname, a locational name for someone who came from a place called Renton. The second element comes from Old English tun meaning "enclosure, settlement; town" while the first element may be derived from Old English given name Regna from Old English element regen "to govern". Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Rudyard

Rudyard comes from an English surname, originally a locational name for someone who came from a place called Rudyard. The second element of the name comes from geard meaning "enclosure; yard" while the first element is either from English rud (red, ruddy) via Old English rudian (ruddy), or from an Old English element meaning "rue" as in the plant. Origin: Proto-Indo-European, …

Camden

Camden comes from an English surname, originating as a locational name for someone who came from a town called Camden. It's made up of Old English campas (enclosure) and denu (valley), essentially meaning "enclosed valley". Nicknames: Cam Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kamden (English)  

Newton

Newton comes from an English surname, originally a locational name for someone who came from a place called Newton. It's made up of Old English elements neowe (new) and tun (enclosure, settlement), meaning "new settlement" or "new town". Nicknames: Newt Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Melville

Melville comes from a Scottish surname of Norman origin, a locational name for several towns in Normandy called Malleville meaning "bad town", made up of from French mal (bad) and ville (town, settlement), which may have come about because of poor soil around the area. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Melvin (English) Melvyn (English) Malvin (English)    

Brigham

Brigham comes from an English surname, originally a locational name for someone who came from a town called Brigham. It's made up of Old English brycg (bridge) and hamm (enclosure; or referring to a low-lying meadow), essentially referring to a bridge that crossed an enclosure or meadow. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Briggam (English) Brigam (English)  

Wentworth

Wentworth comes from an English surname, a locational name meaning "Wintra's enclosure", Wintra being an Old English word for winter combined with worð (enclosure); it may have referred to a settlement that was only used in winter. Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Shelby

Shelby comes from an English surname, of uncertain origin though possible a variant of Selby, made up from Old Norse selja (willow) and býr (settlement, farm), essentially meaning "settlement by the willow". It's also possible that Shelby is made up from Middle English schele "hut" combined with býr (farm, settlement). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Shelbee (English) Shelbie (English) Shellby (English) Selby …

Gilby

Gilby comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from a place called Gilby. The second element comes from Old Norse byr meaning "settlement, farm", while the first part of the name may be a diminutive of Gilbert (meaning "bright pledge” or “bright hostage”), so essentially meaning "Gilbert's farm" or "settlement of Gilbert". It's …

Coram

Coram is an English surname derived from the name of a village called Corham. It seems to be made up from Old English elements corn (corn) and hamm (enclosure; or referring to a low-lying meadow). Coram is also a Latin word meaning "in person; face to face; publicly" and "before; in the presence of" and is used as a …