Locke

Locke comes from a surname of several origins and meanings such as:

  • an English, Dutch, and German surname derived from a place name called Lock, referring to someone who lived near an enclosure or a barrier on a river such as a bridge which could be open and closed at will;
  • it could also be an occupational surname used to refer to a locksmith or a lock-keeper from Old English loc meaning “fastening, lock”;
  • Locke could also have come about as a nickname for someone with curly hair from Old English locc via Proto-Germanic *luka (to bend; turn);
  • I’ve also seen it listed as a romanization of Lok, which is the Cantonese pronunciation of Chinese surname Luo meaning “white horse; camel” with the character 駱 or 骆;
  • it might also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname O’Lochlainn meaning “son of Lochlainn”, Lochlainn being the Irish form of Lachlan, originally a Scottish nickname used to refer to someone who was from Norway; Lochlainn means “land of the lochs”.

Locke also connotes the idea of closing or fastening something shut, as well as referring to a lock of hair.

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Chinese

Variants:

  • Lock (English)
  • Lokk (English)
  • Lok (Cantonese, English)

 

Advertisements

Hermes

Hermes is the name of the Greek god of commerce and trade, known as the trickster god and the protector of thieves, travelers, and athletes, as well as a messenger of the gods and the god of boundaries. He guided the souls of the dead to the underworld. The son of Zeus and Maia, one of the Pleiades, the day after his birth when he was just an infant, Hermes stole his half-brother Apollo’s cattle. When Apollo tracked him down, Hermes gave him a lyre he had just invented from the shell of a tortoise as an apology. He is the father of Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, and the great-grandfather of the hero Odysseus. Although the etymology of the name has been linked to Greek herma meaning “cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker” it could also be related to Proto-European *ser “to bind, put together”; or it could be related to an older word of non-European origin.

Hermes is also a surname, either derived from the name of the Greek god or it could be a Germanic matronynic surname from the given name Ermens, a short form of either Ermelendis (derived from Germanic elements ermen “whole, universal” and linde “soft, tender”) or Ermgart (likely a short form of Ermengarde, also a Germanic name from Germanic ermen “whole, universal” and garde “enclosure”). As a French surname, it could have arisen as a topographic name for someone who lived in a deserted spot or a patch of barren land from Greek eremia “desert, desolate, lonely uninhabited” and the local suffix –ès.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-European, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hermès (French)
  • Ermes (Italian)
  • Ermete (Italian)
  • Ermis (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Hermione (Ancient Greek)
  • Hermia (English)

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Wynstan

Wynstan is a variant spelling of Wynnstan, an Old English name meaning “joy stone” from elements wynn (joy) and stan (stone). It could also be a variant spelling of Winston, which could either be derived from Wynnstan, or else it derives from the name of a town made up from Old English wine/win (friend) and tun (settlement) meaning “friend’s settlement” or “Wine’s settlement”, Wine being a personal given name from Old English win/wine. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Wynnstan (Anglo-Saxon)

 

Gerda

Gerda is the feminine form of Dutch and German given name Gerd, a short form of Gerhard, the Scandinavian form of Gerard meaning “brave spear, hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy). Gerda is also the name of a Norse goddess and jotunn (giant) in Norse mythology, the wife of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse garðr meaning “protection, fenced-in, to enclose”.

Origin: Germanic, Old Norse

57e58ee1cd228e67eb329cf780d83f60

Variants:

  • Gerdina (Dutch)
  • Gerðr (Old Norse)
  • Gerth (Old Norse)

 

Male forms:

  • Gerd (German, Dutch)
  • Gerhard (German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic, Scandinavian)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)

 

Dayton

Dayton comes from an English surname, a locational surname made up from Old English elements  dic (ditch, dike) and tun (enclosure, settlement) meaning “settlement by the ditch” or “settlement surrounded by a dike”, originally referring to someone who lived near such a place.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Deighton
  • Deaton
  • Dyton

 

Quinton

Quinton has two possible origins and meanings. The first is that it’s a variant spelling of Quentin, which is the French form of Roman name Quintinus derived from Quintus meaning “fifth” in Latin, used for a fifth child or a child born in the fifth month of the year.

Quinton is also an English surname meaning “Queen’s town” from Old English elements cwen (queen, woman) and tun (enclosure, settlement, town).

Origin: Latin, Old English

Variants:

  • Quentin (French, English)
  • Quinten (English, Dutch)
  • Quintin (English)
  • Quintinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintillus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilian (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilianus (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Quintina (Ancient Roman)
  • Quinta (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilla (Ancient Roman)

 

Dalton

Dalton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “valley town” or “valley enclosure” from Old English elements dael (dale, valley) ultimately deriving from Proto-Germanic *dalan (curve, arch); and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Old English

 

Clayton

Clayton comes from a surname derived from a place name meaning “clay settlement” from Old English elements claeg (clay) and tun (enclosure, settlement), used to refer to a village on clay soil or near clay soil.

Origin: Old English

93ce3eae04a04e46a3e46ba0c25f82de