Vladimir

Vladimir comes from Slavic element vladeti meaning "to rule" (derived from Proto-Indo-European *wal "to be strong") combined with meru (great, famous) essentially meaning "great ruler" or "famous ruler". However, the second element has also been associated with miru (peace, world) so the name could also mean "peaceful ruler" or "world ruler". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Waldomar (Ancient Germanic) Valdimárr (Ancient Scandinavian) Uladzimir (Belarusian) Vladimír … Continue reading Vladimir

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Herman

Herman is a male name made up of Germanic elements hari (army) and man (man) meaning "army man". It's also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Germanic Variants: Hermann (German) Hermanus (Dutch, Ancient Germanic) Hariman (Ancient Germanic) Hermanni (Finnish) Armand (French) Ármann (Icelandic) Armando (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese) Ermanno (Italian) German (Russian)  

Justin

Justin is the English form of Latin Justinus (or Iustinus) meaning "just, lawful, righteous" which comes from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew- (justice, law) from the root word *h₂ey- (vital force, life age, eternity). Justin is also a surname originating from the given name. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Iustinus (Latin) Iustus (Latin) Justinus (Ancient Roman) Justus (Late Roman, German, Dutch) Juste (French) Giustino (Italian) Justinas (Lithuanian) … Continue reading Justin

Leon

Leon derives from Greek leon meaning "lion" and is the Latin cognate of Leo. Leon is also a surname which may derive from the given name, originally a nickname for someone who was a fierce warrior, though it may also derive from the name of a city in Spain, León, which may come from Latin legio meaning "legion" since it was originally … Continue reading Leon

Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning "lady, mistress", the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master). Origin: Aramaic Variants: Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek) Martta (Finnish) Marthe (French, Norwegian) Marte (Norwegian) Márta (Hungarian) Morta (Lithuanian) Maata (Maori) Marfa (Russian)  

Dober

Dober comes from a Slavic word meaning "good"; it's the name of a settlement (also spelled Dobër and Dobre) in northern Albania. Dober is also a surname of English origin (with various spellings of Dauber, Dawber, Daber, and Doberer), an occupational surname for someone who was a plasterer from Middle English daubere via Old French daubier (whitewash, plasterer). Origin: … Continue reading Dober

Peter

Peter is the English form of Greek Petros meaning "stone, rock". It's also a surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Pete, Petey/Petie Origin: Greek Variants: Petros (Greek, Armenian) Petrus (German, Dutch) Pieter (Dutch) Pier (Dutch, Italian, English) Piers  (Medieval English, Medieval French) Peers (English) Peder (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) Petter (Swedish, Norwegian) Butrus (Arabic) Botros (Arabic) … Continue reading Peter

Nika

Nika is a unisex given name with several possible meanings. It's a Russian short form of Veronika which ultimately comes from Greek Pherenike meaning "bringer of victory, bringing victory", or any name ending in -nika, as well as also being a short form of Nikita, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning "winner, victor". Nika is also the feminine form of male given name Nikola, the … Continue reading Nika

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it's been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation. Origin: Ancient Greek … Continue reading Helena

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. … Continue reading Marko