Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master).

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek)
  • Martta (Finnish)
  • Marthe (French, Norwegian)
  • Marte (Norwegian)
  • Márta (Hungarian)
  • Morta (Lithuanian)
  • Maata (Maori)
  • Marfa (Russian)

 

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Dober

Dober comes from a Slavic word meaning “good”; it’s the name of a settlement (also spelled Dobër and Dobre) in northern Albania. Dober is also a surname of English origin (with various spellings of Dauber, Dawber, Daber, and Doberer), an occupational surname for someone who was a plasterer from Middle English daubere via Old French daubier (whitewash, plasterer).

Origin: Slavic, Old French

 

Peter

Peter is the English form of Greek Petros meaning “stone, rock”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Pete, Petey/Petie

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Petros (Greek, Armenian)
  • Petrus (German, Dutch)
  • Pieter (Dutch)
  • Pier (Dutch, Italian, English)
  • Piers  (Medieval English, Medieval French)
  • Peers (English)
  • Peder (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Petter (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Butrus (Arabic)
  • Botros (Arabic)
  • Boutros (Arabic, Coptic)
  • Bedros (Armenian)
  • Peru (Basque)
  • Petri (Basque, Finnish)
  • Peio (Basque)
  • Petteri (Finnish)
  • Pietari (Finnish)
  • Per (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Breton)
  • Perig (Breton diminutive of Per)
  • Pierrick (Breton, French)
  • Pierre (French, Swedish)
  • Petar (Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Penko (Bulgarian diminutive of Petar)
  • Pere (Catalan)
  • Petru (Corsican, Romanian)
  • Petar (Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
  • Petre (Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Petr (Czech)
  • Petro (Ukrainian, Esperanto)
  • Peeter (Estonian)
  • Petur (Faroese)
  • Pitter (Frisian, Limburgish)
  • Pika (Hawaiian)
  • Péter (Hungarian)
  • Pétur (Icelandic)
  • Peadar (Irish, Scottish)
  • Piaras (Irish)
  • Pietro (Italian)
  • Pierino (Italian diminutive of Pietro)
  • Piero (Italian)
  • Petras (Lithuanian)
  • Petera (Maori)
  • Petruccio (Italiam medieval diminutive of Pietro)
  • Pèire (Occitan)
  • Piotr (Polish)
  • Pedro (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Pedrinho (Portuguese diminutive of Pedro)
  • Pyotr (Russian)
  • Petya (Russian diminutive of Pyotr)
  • Petia (Russian diminutive of Pyotr)
  • Pedr (Welsh)
  • Perrin (French diminutive of Pierre)
  • Piere (Swedish)

 

Female forms:

  • Petra (English, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish)
  • Petrina (English diminutive of Petra)
  • Pietra (Italian)
  • Piera (Italian)
  • Pierina (Italian diminutive of Piero)
  • Peta (English Australian)
  • Perrine (French)
  • Pierrette (French diminutive of Pierre)

 

Nika

Nika is a unisex given name with several possible meanings. It’s a Russian short form of Veronika which ultimately comes from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringer of victory, bringing victory”, or any name ending in -nika, as well as also being a short form of Nikita, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning “winner, victor”. Nika is also the feminine form of male given name Nikola, the Slavic form of Nicholas “victory of the people”, as well as also being the (male) dimininutive of Nikoloz, the Georgian form of Nicholas.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nica (Spanish, Swedish)

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Sandra

Sandra was originally a nickname for Alessandra, the Italian form of Alexandra, a Greek female form of Alexander meaning “defender of man” or “defending men” from Greek alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man), though it could also be a nickname for Alexandra as well.

Sandra could also be a nickname for another Greek name, Cassandra, possibly meaning “exceling man”, “surpassing man” or “shining man”; the first part of the name is uncertain though it could be derived from Greek kekasmai (to excel, to shine) while the second part of the name comes from Greek aner (man).

Nicknames: Sandy/Sandi/Sandie

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Xandra (English)
  • Sondra (English)
  • Saundra (Scottish, English)
  • Sandrine (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Sander (English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Xander (English, Dutch)
  • Sandro (Italian, Georgian)

 

David

David comes from a Hebrew male name meaning “beloved”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Dave, Davey/Davie/Davi

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dávid (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Dovid (Yiddish)
  • Daud (Arabic, Indonesian)
  • Dawud (Arabic)
  • Dawood (Arabic)
  • Dawid (Polish, Biblical Hebrew)
  • Daveth (Cornish)
  • Taavet (Estonian)
  • Taavetti (Finnish)
  • Davit (Georgian)
  • Daviti (Georgian)
  • Dáibhí (Irish)
  • Dàibhidh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Daividh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Davi (Portuguese Brazilian)
  • Davide (Italian)
  • Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • Davud (Persian)
  • Dafydd (Welsh)
  • Dewi (Welsh)
  • Dewydd (Old Welsh)
  • Davíd (Icelandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Davina (English)
  • Davena (English)
  • Davinia (English)
  • Davida (English)

Niko

Niko is a masculine name, the Finnish form of Nicholas which means “victory of the people” from Greek Nikolaos. It’s also the Croatian and Slovene short form of Nikola, the Slavic form of Nicholas. However, Niko can also be used as a short form of Nicholas or its’ feminine forms Nicole and Nicolette, making it a unisex name.

Niko also seems to have a Japanese origin but I couldn’t find anything concrete behind it or the meaning. If anyone knows more about it, please let me know 🙂

Origin: Greek

 

Variants:

  • Nico

 

Daniel

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: a male name meaning “God is my judge”.

As well as being a given name, Daniel is also a surname from the same source.

Nicknames include Danny/Dannie/Danni and Dan.

Variants:

  • Danilo (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian)
  • Daniele (Italian)
  • Danijel (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Danyal (Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish)
  • Taniel (Armenian)
  • Danel (Basque)
  • Deniel (Breton)
  • Danail (Bulgarian)
  • Daniël (Dutch)
  • Dániel (Hungarian, Faroese)
  • Dánjal (Faroese)
  • Taneli (Finnish)
  • Daníel (Icelandic)
  • Daniels (Latvian)
  • Danielius (Lithuanian)
  • Daniil (Russian)
  • Deiniol (Welsh)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Danielle (French, English)
  • Danièle (French)
  • Daniela (Bulgarian, Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, English)
  • Daniella (English)
  • Dana (Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew)
  • Danijela (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Daniëlle (Dutch)