Barnaby

Barnaby is a Medieval English form of Barnabas, the Greek form of an Aramaic name of uncertain meaning though it could mean “son of the prophet” or perhaps “son of encouragement” or “son of consolation”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Barney

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Barnabas (English, German, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek)
  • Barnabé (French)
  • Barnabás (Hungarian)
  • Varnava (Russian)

 

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Keegan

Keegan comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Mac Aodhagáin, meaning “son of Aodhagán”, the latter a pet diminutive (or sort of nickname) for Aodh, a male given name meaning “fire” from Old Irish Áed deriving from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eydʰ- (to burn, kindle; fire).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Keagan (English)
  • Kegan (English)
  • Egan (English)
  • Eagan (English)

 

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Apollo

Apollo is the Greek god of prophecy, medicine, the sun, light, music, poetry, plague and disease, and one of the most important gods in both the Greek and Roman pantheon. He is the twin brother of Artemis and often associated with the sun (and Artemis the moon), and the son of Zeus and Leto. His name is of uncertain etymology and meaning though the ancient Greeks often associated it with the Greek apollymi meaning “to destroy”. It’s also been associated with Doric apella “wall”, later referring to an assembly. Other possible theories regarding the name link it to Indo-European apelo “strength”, Greek apolusis “to redeem”, apolousis “purification”, apoloúōn “washing”, apolúōn “delivering”, aploun “simple”, and aei bállōn “always shooting (arrows)”. However, it seems more likely that Apollo is pre-Greek in origin, perhaps related to Appaliunas, an Anatolian god  whose name possibly means “father light” or “father lion”, though it could also be related to the name of a Hittite god related to Aplu, a Hurrian and Hittite god of plague and healing; the name might be derived from Akkadian Aplu Enlil meaning “the son of Enlil”, a title given to the Mesopotamian god Nergal (who was the god of war, pestilence, and death), though I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “father light” or “father lion”. Appaliunas might also have a Luwian etymology (Luwian being an ancient language related to Anatolian and closely related to Hittite) from *appal- meaning “trap, snare, pitfall, ambush”.

Origin: Indo-European, Greek, Akkadian

Variants:

  • Apollon (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollinaris (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollonios (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollinaire (French)
  • Apolinary (Polish)
  • Apolinar (Spanish)
  • Apollodorus (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollodoros (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Apolla
  • Apollonia (Ancient Greek, Italian)
  • Apollodora (Ancient Greek)
  • Apolena (Slovak, Czech)
  • Apolonia (Spanish, Polish)
  • Apolline (French)

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

 

Benji

Benji is a nickname for Benjamin or its feminine form Benjamina, the English form of Hebrew Binyamin meaning “son of the south” or “son of the right hand” from Hebrew ben (son of) and yamin (right hand, south).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Benjy (English)
  • Benjamin (English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Binyamin (Hebrew, Arabic)
  • Benjamín (Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic)
  • Benjámin (Hungarian)
  • Beniamino (Italian)
  • Benjaminas (Lithuanian)
  • Venijamin (Macedonian)
  • Benjamim (Portuguese)
  • Beniamin (Romanian, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek)
  • Veniamin (Russian)
  • Venyamin (Russian)
  • Bünyamin (Turkish)
  • Peni (Hawaiian)

 

Female forms:

  • Benjamine (French)
  • Benjamina (English)

 

Maxwell

Maxwell comes from a Scottish surname meaning “Mack’s stream”, Mack possibly being a form of Magnus, a given name derived from Latin meaning “great”, combined with Old English wella (stream). Mack could also be derived from Gaelic mac (son); Macca might also be derived from Old Norse makr “easy to deal with”.

Nicknames: Max

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

Jensen

Jensen is a surname originally of Scandinavian origin meaning “son of Jens”, Jens being the Danish form of John, a Hebrew male name meaning “God is gracious”. It was a patronymic surname referring to the son of a man named Jens.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Jenson (English)

 

 

Ruby

Ruby is the name of a red-colored to pinkish gemstone. The name comes from Latin rubeus meaning “red”. Though the name is traditionally a girl’s name, it has been used for boys in the past, which is why I’m listing it as a unisex name.

Ruby could also be a nickname for Rueben, a male Hebrew name meaning “behold, a son”.

Origin: Latin

Female forms:

  • Rubina (Italian)
  • Rubee (English)
  • Rubi (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Rubeus (Latin)