Color, Earth, Elements, G names, Gray, Kin/Family, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names

Greyston

Greyston comes from an English surname, a variant spelling of Grayston meaning "gray stone" made up of Old English elements grǣġ (grey) and stān (stone). It's also possible that the first element is derived from Middle English greyve meaning "steward" combined with the patronymic suffix -son, with would make it a variant of Grayson. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Greystone (English) Grayston (English) Graystone (English)  

Ancient Greek, Earth, Elements, Female, Food, Nature, P names, Pear

Perina

Perina could be a variant spelling of Pierina, an Italian diminutive of Piera, the feminine form of Piero which is the Italian form of Peter meaning "stone, rock" from Greek Petros. It's also an elaborated form of pera, the Italian word for "pear"; it's the name of the heroine in the Italian folktale The Little Girl Sold with the Pears. Origin: Ancient… Continue reading Perina

Ancient Greek, Earth, Elements, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, P names, Surname names

Pedro

Pedro is the Spanish and Portuguese form of Peter, the English form of Ancient Greek Petros meaning “stone, rock” derived from an unknown source. Pedro is also a surname originating from the given name. The name was used by Shakespeare for one of his characters in his play Much Ado About Nothing (1598-99). Nicknames: Pedrinho (Portuguese) Origin: Ancient Greek Variants… Continue reading Pedro

Earth, Elements, M names, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Macon

Macon is an anglicized spelling of Maçon, a French surname meaning "mason", likely an occupational name for a stonemason. It may also be derived from a habitational name, from the French city of Mâcon, which may be an oblique form of Germanic personal name Mako, via Mago, a short form of a compound name from Old High German maht meaning "strength,… Continue reading Macon

A names, Celtic, Earth, Elements, Female, Gaelic, Gaulish/Celtic mythology, Hawaiian, Irish mythology, Mythology, Nature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Scottish, Virtues/Attributes

Alana

Alana is the feminine form of Alan, an English male name of uncertain etymology which may possibly mean “little rock” or “noble” from Old Irish ail. It also means “beautiful, handsome” from Scottish Gaelic àlainn (beautiful, fine, splendid). Alan may also be derived from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, which may be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti meaning “to nourish, grow” from Proto-Indo-European… Continue reading Alana

Ancient Greek, E names, Earth, Elements, Female, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Emery

Emery comes from an English surname, the Norman form of Emmerich, a Germanic male name. While the second element of the name comes from ric meaning “power, rule”, the first part of the name is a little more complicated. It could be from Germanic ermen meaning “whole, universal”, amal “work, labor” (which would make it a variant of Amalric), or heim “home”. Emery… Continue reading Emery

Animals, Birds, Crow, Earth, Elements, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Raven, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Rocco

Rocco is an Italian male name which comes from an Ancient Germanic element of uncertain meaning though I've seen several possible meanings for it: Proto-Germanic *hrōkaz (rook, crow), hrok (rest), rohon (to roar, shout). It's also possible that Rocco is a variant form of Rocca, a locational name for someone who came from a place called Rocca, meaning "fortress, stronghold;… Continue reading Rocco

Animals, B names, Earth, Elements, Female, Male, Nature, Place names, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Wolf

Boston

Boston is the name of the capital in Massachusetts, named after a town in Lincolnshire, England, meaning “Botulf’s settlement” or “Botulf’s stone”, Botulf/Botolph being an Old English name made up of Old English boda (messenger, envoy; prophet) and wulf (wolf), combined with Old English elements tun (settlement) or stan (stone). It was either named after a saint who might have built a monastary around… Continue reading Boston