Valerian

Valerian comes from Roman cognomen Valerianus which comes from Latin valeo meaning “to be healthy, strong”, derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). Valerian is also the name of a flower and an herb, as well as a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Valerius (Ancient Roman)
  • Valerianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Valérian (French)
  • Valère (French)
  • Walerian (Polish)
  • Walery (Polish)
  • Valeri (Bulgarian, Georgian, Russian)
  • Valeriy (Russian)
  • Valero (Spanish)
  • Valerio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Valério (Portuguese)
  • Valērijs (Latvian)
  • Valeriu (Romanian)
  • Valeriano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Valeriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Valériane (French)
  • Valeria (Ancient Roman, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German)
  • Valerie (English, German, Czech)
  • Valérie (French, Czech)
  • Valera
  • Valeriane

 

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Briana

Briana is the feminine form of Brian, an Irish name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Old Celtic element bre meaning “hill” which, by extension, also means “high, noble”.It could also be related to Celtic brig- or brigant- meaning “high”, briga- meaning “might” and “power”, or brigh- meaning “noble, strong, virtuous”. Briana is a character in The Faerie Queen, an epic poem written by English poet Edmund Spenser, an allegorical work celebrating the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. It was published between 1590 and 1596 though he died before he could finish the entirety of the poem.

Nicknames: Bri/Bree

Origin: Old Celtic

Variants:

  • Brianna
  • Bryana
  • Bryanna
  • Breanna
  • Brina
  • Bryna
  • Breann
  • Brianne
  • Breanne
  • Breeanne
  • Bryanne

 

Male forms:

  • Brian
  • Brion
  • Bryan
  • Bryon

 

Kenya

Kenya is the name of a country in Africa named after Mount Kenya. The origin of the name itself is not clear-

  • it could be a corruption of the Kikuyu, Embu, and Kamba words Kirinyaga, Kirenyaa and Kiinyaa which mean “God’s resting place” in all three languages. The mountain represents an important aspect within their cultures, believing it was where God lived;
  • it may also come from Kukuyu kere nyaga meaning “white mountain” or “mountain of whiteness”;
  • it could be derived from Akamba kiima kya kenia meaning “the mountain that shines”, kenia being the Akamba word for “shine” or “glitter”;
  • it may also be from the Ameru word kirimira which translates to “mountain with white features”;
  • it may also be translated from Kikuyu to “the place with ostriches”.

Kenya is also a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + to be” (健也)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + how; what; alas; question mark” (健哉)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + all the more; increasingly” (健弥)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + dart, arrow” (健矢)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + question mark” (健耶)
  • “concurrently; and; beforehand; in advance + to be” (兼也)

Written in hiragana it’s けんや (Ken’ya).

Origin: Kikuyu, Embu, Kamba, Akamba, Japanese

 

Variants:

  • Kenia (English)
  • Ken’ya (Japanese) m

 

Saeran

Saeran seems to be a male name possibly of Irish origin maning “noble” although I’m not sure of the accuracy of that. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Welsh Saer meaning “carpenter, wright” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “Saer the younger” or “little Saer”. There’s a church in Wales called St. Saeran’s Church dedicated to Saint Saeran, a Celtic bishop.

Saeran also seems to be a Korean male name (also spelled Serran) written with Korean hangul meaning “three + that/what is called” or “bird + that/what is called” though it has several meanings in hanja (Korean reading of Chinese characters) with the 세 (se) reading such as:

  • 世 (generation; world; society; lifetime)

  • 稅 (tax; duty)
  • 勢 (power, force; energy; military strength)

  • 歲 (year; age)
  • 細 (fine, thin; slender)
  • 洗 (to wash)
  • 貰 (get; have; obtain)
  • 笹 (bamboo grass)
  • 說 (explain; seek; talk)

and with the 란 (ran): 

  • 欄 (column)
  • 卵 (egg, ovum)
  • 蘭 (orchid)

Origin: Irish, Welsh, Korean

Variants:

  • Serran
  • Seran

 

Gabrielle

Gabrielle is the French feminine form of Gabriel, which comes from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”.

Nicknames: Gabby, Brielle

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gabriella (Hungarian, Italian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gabriel (English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak)
  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Vikram

Vikram is an Indian male name, the modern form of Vikrama meaning “stride, pace” (in reference to someone who undertakes purposeful action) or “valor” in Sanskrit, referring to one who is wise, brave, and strong as well as victorious. It was used as another name for Hindu god Vishnu, the protector and preserver of the universe. Vikramaditya is the name of a legendary emperor in ancient India, also known as Vikrama. His name means “sun of valor”, combining the names Vikram (valor) and aditya (sun).

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Vikrama (Indian)

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Ella

Ella comes from Germanic element alja meaning “other, another, foreign” and from which the name Eleanor/Alianor comes from. Ella could also be a nickname for names beginning and ending with ella such as Gabriella (feminine form of Gabriel meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”) and Daniella (feminine form of Daniel meaning “God is my judge”), Elizabeth (meaning “God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”) and Eleanor, which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”. Ella is also the Spanish and Italian word for “she”.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alia (Ancient Germanic)

 

Phineas, Phineus

Phineas is a male name of uncertain meaning and etymology. It’s been linked to Hebrew meaning “serpent’s mouth” or “oracle”, as well as Ancient Egyptian meaning “the Nubian”. Spelled Phineus, it’s a Greek name borne by several figures in Greek mythology. The most notable bearer is a king of Thrace who features in the Argonautica, a Greek epic poem written about Jason and the Argonauts. This Phineus is either the son of Agenor or Poseidon, god of the sea, who had the gift of foresight and was blinded because he revealed too much of the gods’ plans (though there are different versions of how he became blind). The Argonauts came upon him on an island and agreed to help them on their voyage if they helped him get rid of the Harpies that were constanty harassing him by eating his food everytime he tried to eat. The meaning behind the name is unknown as well, though I’ve seen it listed as possibly meaning “vulture” or it might be composed from Greek elements iphios (strong, stout) and noûs (mind, reason, understanding) so essentially meaning “strong mind” or “strong understanding”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Phinehas (Biblical)
  • Phinees (Biblical Greek)
  • Pinchas (Hebrew)
  • Finees (Biblical Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Phinea

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant