Tristan

Tristan is the Old French form of Drustan,  a Pictish diminutive of Drust likely derived from Celtic drest meaning “riot” or “tumult”, possibly in reference to the noise of the “clanking of swords”. The spelling was changed to resemble the French word triste meaning “sad, sorrowful”, likely because of the tragic affair of Tristan and Isolde- they fell in love after drinking a love potion even though she was engaged to his uncle, Mark of Cornwall, and conducted a secret affair even after her marriage. When his uncle found out he either banished Tristan in some versions while in others he killed him.

Origin: Celtic

Variants:

  • Trystan (Welsh)
  • Trysten (English)
  • Tristram (Medieval English)
  • Triston (English)
  • Tristin (English)
  • Tristen (English)
  • Drystan (Welsh)
  • Drust (Ancient Celtic)
  • Drustan (Ancient Celtic)
  • Drest (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tristão (Portuguese)
  • Tristán (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Trista (English)
  • Trysta (English)
  • Tristine (English)
  • Tristina (English)
  • Trystine (English)
  • Trystina (English)

 

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Troy

Troy has several possible meanings and etymologies behind it:

  • it comes from a surname derived from a city in Troyes, France, used to describe someone who came from there. The name comes from Latin Tricasses, the name of a Gallic tribe that lived in the area. The first part of the name comes from tri meaning “three” although the second element, cass-, is a little trickier. It may mean “bronze, tin, brass” or “battle”;
  • Troy may also be the Anglicized form of a Gaelic surname, Ó Troighthigh meaning “descendant of Troightheach”, the latter a person name meaning “foot soldier”;
  • Troy is also the name of an ancient city in Asia Minor in what is now Turkey, that features in Homer’s Iliad, in which a ten year war between the Trojans and the Greeks rages on over the abduction of Helen by Paris, son of King Priam. It was known as Troia in Ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Ilium by the Romans; the name may have been derived from the name of a king, Tros, the founder of Troy and its ancestors, and the father of Ganymede, who was taken by Zeus and made the official cupbearer of the gods in Mount Olympus. I couldn’t find the etymology behind the name;
  • it may also be an Americanized spelling of Treu, a German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) surname meaning “true, loyal, faithful” in Middle High German;
  • it could also be a Dutch surname, derived from Middle Dutch troye, meaning “doublet, jerkin”, either an occupational name for a tailor or a nickname for someone who wore a particular garment that was striking enough to be singular;
  • I’ve also seen it listed as being a Dutch short form of Gertrude, from a Germanic name meaning “spear of strength”.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic, Ancient Greek, German, Dutch

Variants:

  • Troye (English, French)
  • Troi (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Troya
  • Troia (Latin, Greek)
  • Troi (English)

 

Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

Tamerlane

Tamerlane is the westernized form of Timur which comes from Proto-Turkic temür meaning “iron”. Timur was a Turkic-Mongol emperor who was known as Timur the Lame by Europeans, which became Tamerlane, because of wounds sustained by arrows that struck his right leg and hand which gave him crippling injuries.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Variants:

  • Tamerlan
  • Timur (Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian, Turkish)
  • Timour
  • Temir (Kazakh)
  • Temur (Georgian)
  • Temuri (Georgian)
  • Temür (Old Turkic)
  • Demir (Turkish)
  • Timur (Turkish)

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Torcan

Torcan is a male name made up from Old Irish torcc “boar” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “little boar” or “wild boar”. It also seems to be a Turkish male name possibly meaning “shy, bashful, coy, reserved”. Torcan is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Old Irish, Turkish

Variants:

  • Torcán (Irish)
  • Torccán (Irish)

 

Thistle

Thistle is the name of a genus of prickly plants which comes from Old English þistel from Proto-Germanic *þistilaz which seems to come from Proto-Indo-European *steig-,*steyg- meaning “to prick”. Thistle also refers to a color, a pale purplish color like the flower, as well as also being the national emblem of Scotland. It’s also a surname, likely used to refer to someone who lived near an abundance of thistles or used as a nickname for someone who had a prickly personality.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)

 

Tyrese

Tyrese is a masculine given name, a modern American name which could be a combination of Ty (a short form of names such as Tyler, Tyrone, and Tyson) and Reese, the Anglicized form of Welsh name Rhys meaning “ardor”, “enthusiasm”, “splendor, glory”. It could also be an elaborated form of Tyree, a variant form of McIntyre, a Gaelic surname meaning “son of the craftsman” or “son of the carpenter”.

Origin: Gaelic, Welsh, English

Variants:

  • Tyreese (English)