Hill

Hill comes from an English surname with several possible meanings such as:

  • it may have derived from a topographical name for someone who lived near or on a hill; the name comes from Old English hyll borrowed from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to rise, to be tall);
  • it may also have been used as a medieval given name, a shortened form of Hilary/Hillary, derived from Latin hilarius meaning “cheerful, merry, happy”;
  • it may also derive from any personal name beginning with the Germanic element hild meaning “battle” such as Hilda;

Origin:  Proto-Indo-European, Latin, Germanic

 

 

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Saga

Saga is the name of an Old Norse goddess of wisdom and seems to be another name for the goddess Frigg. The name seems to come from Old Norse sjá meaning “to see”, likely in reference to the fact that she is a seeress. Saga is also a word derived from Old Norse saga meaning “saga, story”, cognate with Old English sagu (story, tale, statement). A saga originally referred to stories in Old Norse about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, sometimes romanticized about battles and heroes that happened in the past.

In Latin, saga means “fortune-teller, sooth-sayer, female sage”. It also seems to have some Japanese roots, the name of an emperor of Japan in the 9th century. Wikipedia writes his name with the kanji 嵯峨 meaning “steep, rugged + high mountain”. Saga is also a Japanese surname as well as the name of a prefecture in Japan, whose capital city is also called Saga.

Origin: Old Norse, Latin, Japanese

 

 

 

 

Yutaka

Yutaka is a Japanese male name meaning “abundant, plentiful, rich” from Japanese 豊, though it has other meanings depending on the kanji used such as: “prosperous, rich” (); “excellent, outstanding, kind, tenderness” (優); “fertile, lush, abundant” ()“warm” (温); “male, excellent + tall, high, flying” (雄高); “tolerant” (); and other meanings depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese