Parley

Parley is an English word (also spelled parlay) meaning "to talk, to speak, to confer", referring to a temporary truce between enemies. It derives from French parler (to speak, to talk) which comes from Latin parabola (comparison, likeness; parable) via Ancient Greek parabole (to set side by side). Parley is also an English surname derived from a place name meaning "pear … Continue reading Parley

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Tyson

Tyson comes from an English surname, either a variant of Dyson, a matronymic surname meaning "son of Dye", Dye being a medieval form of Dionysia, the female form of Dionysius, the Greek god of vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite … Continue reading Tyson

Rio

Rio has two separate origins and meanings. The first is that it is a Spanish and Portuguese word and place name meaning "river" derived from Latin rivus (brook, small stream) which comes from Proto-Indo-European *h₃er- (to flow, to move). It's also a Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian surname derived from the given name referring to someone who lived near … Continue reading Rio

Belinda

Belinda is a female given name of uncertain origin and meaning. Though the first part of the name is often associated with Italian  bella meaning "beautiful" (which comes from Latin bellus "beautiful, pretty, handsome"), the name has an older Germanic source, Betlindis, so it seems more likely that the first element is Germanic in origin. While the second … Continue reading Belinda

Oleander

Oleander is the name of a flowering shrub belonging to the genus Nerium, which is poisonous to humans if ingested. The name comes from Late Latin lorandrum from Ancient Greek rhododendron meaning "rose tree" from Ancient Greek elements rhodon (rose) and dendron (tree). The spelling of the name may have been changed to resemble Latin olea meaning "olive tree" because it apparently resembles an olive tree. … Continue reading Oleander

Moria

Moria is a female given name with several etymologies and meanings: it's a the name of a Naiad nymph in Greek mythology whose brother Tylos was killed by a dragon, though she later brought him back to life with a magical herb. This myth is similar to the story of Pelops, who had been killed … Continue reading Moria

Orin

Orin could be a variant of Orrin, itself an anglicized form of Odhrán, an Irish male name meaning "little pale green one", or a variant spelling of Oren, a Hebrew male name meaning "pine tree". It's also a surname originating from the given name. Orin is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji … Continue reading Orin

Lyndon

Lyndon comes from an English surname meaning "lime tree hill" or "flax hill" from Old English elements lind (lime tree) derived from Proto-Germanic *linþaz (flexible, supple, mild), or lin (flax) and dun (hill). It was originally used as a topographical name for someone who lived near lime trees. Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic Variants: Lindon (English) Linden (English)  

Kai

Kai is a name with various origins and meanings: it's a Hawaiian unisex name meaning "sea"; it's also a Japanese name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as: (海) "sea, ocean"; (貝) "shellfish"; (快) "cheerful, pleasant, agreeable, comfortable"; (戒) "commandment", and other various meanings; as well as also being a compound of … Continue reading Kai

Dorian

Dorian comes from the name of an ancient Greek tribe called the Dorians. According to mythology, they got their name from their founder, Dorus, which at first glance seems related to Greek doron meaning "gift" from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃rom (gift) from the root *deh₃- (to give). However, the exact origins of the name are not uncertain. It's possible Dorian also derives from Proto-Indo-European … Continue reading Dorian