Evander

Evander is the English form of Evandros, a Greek male name meaning “good man” from Greek elements eu (good) and aner (man). In Roman mythology, Evander was born in Arcadia but later went to Italy, bringing with him the Greek alphabet, laws, and pantheon, and founded the city of Pallantium about sixty years before the Trojan War, and which would later merge with ancient Rome. He was the son of the Roman god Mercury (his Greek counterpart being Hermes) and Carmenta, the Roman goddess of childbirth and prophecy.

Evander has also been used as an anglicized form of Iomhar, a Scottish form of Ivor, the Old Norse form of Ívarr meaning “yew warrior” or “bow warrior” from yr (yew, bow) and arr (warrior).

Origin: Greek

 

Variants:

  • Evandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Evandrus (Latin)
  • Euandros (Greek mythology)
  • Evandro (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Ivor (Scottish, Irish, Welsh, English)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Ívarr (Ancient Scandinavian)

 

Female forms:

  • Evandra (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Evandria

 

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Willow

Willow comes from Old English welig from Proto-Germanic *wiligaz via Proto-Indo-European *wel meaning “to turn, to wind, twist”. Willow is the name of a tree or shrub from the genus Salix, which grows along damp or watery areas. They are tough and flexible. It’s also a surname originally referring to somone who lived near a willow tree.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Cadrian

Cadrian seems to be a modern English name, either an elaborated form of Cade, which has a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • being an English surname derived from a metonymic occupational surname for a cooper (someone who made and repaired barrels) which comes from Old French cade (cask, barrel);
  • it could also be from a Medieval English given name, Cada, which comes from a Germanic root word meaning “lump” or “swelling”;
  • it may also be related to Middle English cade referring to a pet or domestic animal that has been abandoned by its mother and reared by hand. The word itself comes from an unknown origin. As a surname it seems to have originated as a nickname for a gentle or inoffensive person;
  • Cade is also another name for the Juniperus oxycedrus (also known as prickly juniper or cade juniper ( from French genévrier cade);
  • Cade is also the Italian third-person singular present meaning “fall” from Latin cadere (fall).

It’s also possible that Cadrian is another form of Adrian, which comes from Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Cadrian also seems to have some use as a surname although

Origin: Old French, Germanic, Middle English, Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Cadrien (English)
  • Adrian (English)
  • Cade (English)
  • Cadrienne (English) f
  • Cadrianne (English) f

 

Lubna

Lubna is an Arabic female name meaning “storax (tree)” in Arabic, storax being a type of tree from which a liquid balsam could be obtained from it, used in perfumes and medicine. There’s a 7th century Arabic love story of Qays and Lubna. They grew up in the same tribe and Qays loved Lubna but her father refused to allow him to marry her and she was soon married off to another man. Qays grew crazy with his unobtainable love and he left his tribe and began wandering around in the desert, reciting poetry to himself or writing poetry in the sand with a stick. Lubna died of an illness soon after her marriage and he was later found dead at the grave of an unknown woman where he had graved three verses of poetry on a nearby rock. There are other versions of the story.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Loubna

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)

 

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning “Lord, have mercy”, the vocative form of Kyrios meaning “lord” or “master”. It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning “peel”, “skin” or “bark, rind” referring to the “bark of a tree” as well as an Indonesian and Malay word meaning “left”. Kiri is also a Maltese word meaning “hire” or “rental”, an Estonian word meaning “writing”, “letter”, “script”, as well as a Japanese female name meaning “pear tree” (樹梨) or “fog, mist” () though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s also the word for the paulownia tree (桐). Kyri is also a surname, likely derived from the Greek meaning of the name.

Origin: Greek, Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Kyrie (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Kiri (Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonia, Japanese, English)
  • Kyria (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Kyrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Kyriakos (Ancient Greek)

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Elder

Elder is a Portuguese male name, a variant of Hélder which either derives its name from a Dutch town called Den Helder possibly meaning “hell’s door” in Dutch, or “hill/hilly grounds”, or it could be a derived from Germanic given name Hulderic meaning “merciful ruler” or “graceful ruler” from Germanic elements hulda (merciful, graceful) and ric (power, rule). Elder is also a surname, originally used to differentiate between two men with the same name (like a father and son) and Elder would refer to the oldest (or senior). As an English word it’s used to refer to someone who is older or who had a higher rank.

Elder also refers to a type of tree as well as a flower deriving from Old English ellærn meaning “elderberry tree”. The elder tree is often depicted in folklore, associated with magic and witchcraft. One such folklore is that if a person cut down an elder tree without permission of the Elder-Mother than it would take revenge upon that person, and that witches tend to congregate under an elder tree.

Origin: Dutch, Germanic, Old English

Male forms:

  • Hélder (Portuguese)
  • Helder (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Eldra (English)

 

Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)