Evander

Evander is the English form of Evandros, a Greek male name meaning “good man” from Greek elements eu (good) and aner (man). In Roman mythology, Evander was born in Arcadia but later went to Italy, bringing with him the Greek alphabet, laws, and pantheon, and founded the city of Pallantium about sixty years before the Trojan War, and which would later merge with ancient Rome. He was the son of the Roman god Mercury (his Greek counterpart being Hermes) and Carmenta, the Roman goddess of childbirth and prophecy.

Evander has also been used as an anglicized form of Iomhar, a Scottish form of Ivor, the Old Norse form of Ívarr meaning “yew warrior” or “bow warrior” from yr (yew, bow) and arr (warrior).

Origin: Greek

 

Variants:

  • Evandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Evandrus (Latin)
  • Euandros (Greek mythology)
  • Evandro (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Ivor (Scottish, Irish, Welsh, English)
  • Íomhar (Irish)
  • Ivar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Ívarr (Ancient Scandinavian)

 

Female forms:

  • Evandra (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Evandria

 

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Herodias

Herodias is the feminine form of Herod, a Greek name meaning “song of the hero” from Greek elements heros (hero, warrior) and oide (song, ode).

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Erodiade (Italian)
  • Aradia (Italian)
  • Hérodiade (French)
  • Heroda (English)
  • Herodia
  • Erodias
  • Irodiada (Romanian)
  • Herodiana (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Herod (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodes (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodion (Ancient Greek)
  • Rodion (Russian)
  • Rodya (Russian diminutive of Rodion)
  • Herodianus (Latin)

 

Haroun

Haroun is the Arabic form of Aaron, possibly meaning “high mountain”, “bright” or “exalted”, though the etymology behind the name is uncertain. It seems more likely that it comes from an Egyptian origin whose meaning has long since been lost. However, according to Wiktionary, it’s likely related to an Ancient Egyptian aha rw meaning “warrior lion” although considering it’s the only source I’ve found that lists it so, I don’t know how accurate that is. In fact I’m almost positive it’s not an accurate etymology, but it would be so cool if it were. Haroun is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Harun (Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Haroon (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Aaron (English, Hebrew)
  • Arron (English)
  • Aaren (English)
  • Aerin (English)
  • Aron (Polish, Croatian, Scandinavian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic)
  • Aarón (Spanish)
  • Áron (Hungarian)

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Oliver

Oliver is a male given name that has two possible origins. The first is that it could be from Germanic Alfhar from Old Norse Alvar meaning “elf warrior” or “elf army” from Old Norse elements alfr (elf) and arr (warrior, army); or it’s derived from another Old Norse name, Áleifr, meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Oliver is also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Olly/Ollie

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Olivier (Dutch, French)
  • Olivér (Hungarian)
  • Oliviero (Italian)
  • Oliwier (Polish)

 

Female forms:

  • Olivera (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Olivette (English)
  • Olivia (English, Spanish, Italian, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Olivia

Olivia is a female given name first used by Shakespeare for a character in his play Twelfth Night (1602). He could have based it from Latin Oliva meaning “olive” or he could have based as a feminine form of Oliver, which either derives from Germanic name Alfher from Old Norse Alvar meaning “elf warrior” or “elf army”; or it could be from Old Norse Olaf meaning “ancestor’s descendant”.

Origin: Latin, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Olyvia (English)
  • Alivia (English)
  • Olivie (French, Czech)
  • Olívia (Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak)
  • Oliwia (Polish)
  • Ólivía (Icelandic)
  • Oliva (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Oliver

Hera

Hera is the Greek goddess of marriage, childbirth, women and family. She is also the queen of the gods, the wife of Zeus. Apparently Zeus fell in love with her at first sight but she refused his first marriage proposal, but he refused to give up so easily. He turned himself into a cuckoo bird and pretended to be in trouble outside her window. Feeling pity for the small bird, Hera brought it inside and held it to her breast, and Zeus transformed back into himself, and she agreed to be his wife out of shame. Their marriage, though, was anything but a happy one according to all the myths. Zeus was a womanizer and fathered many children with many women to Hera’s intense jealousy, and she would often go after the poor women and their offspring with vengeance. Although the etymology behind the name is unclear, it has been associated with Greek heros “hero, warrior”; hora “time, season”; or haireo “to be chosen”.

Some symbols of Hera are the cuckoo bird, peacocks, pomegranates, the scepter and the diadem, as well as the cow, the apple tree, the willow, the fig, the myrrh, lily, and the orange tree.

Origin: Greek