Ruth

Ruth is a Hebrew female name of uncertain origin though the most popular theory is that it is linked to Hebrew re’ut meaning “companion” or “friend”, though other possible theories include: “refreshment”, “appearance, beauty”, and “pasture”. Ruth may also be related to Middle English word ruthe or reuth meaning “pity, compassion”, “sorrow, grief” derived from Old Norse hryggð (sorrow, grief). Ruth is also a Limburgish short form of Rutger, the Dutch form of Roger meaning “famous spear” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and ger (spear). Ruth is also a surname.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse, Germanic

Variants:

  • Ruthie (English)
  • Rut (Swedish, Spanish, Icelandic, Hebrew)
  • Routh (Greek)
  • Ruut (Finnish)
  • Rūta (Lithuanian)
  • Ruta (Polish)
  • Rute (Portuguese)
  • Ruf (Russian)

 

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Percy

Percy is a short form of Percival, first created by French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the story of the Grail in the 12th century. It’s likely the name was based on Welsh Peredur meaning “hard spear” though the spelling of the name was altered to resemble Old French percer val “to pierce the valley”. Percival is one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legends. Percy could also be a nickname for Perseus, a figure from Greek mythology (son of the Greek god Zeus); though the etymology behind his name in uncertain, it has been linked to Greek perthein meaning “to waste, ravage, sack, destroy”.

Percy is also a surname derived from the name of a Norman town called Percy-en-Auge which may originally have been a Gaulish name Latinized as Persius, which is also a Roman family name though it may also be from Old French percer (to pierce, to breach) and haie (hedge, enclosure), perhaps given to a soldier who breached a fortification or a poacher who hunted in a private park.

Origin: Welsh, Old French, Greek

Variants:

  • Piercy
  • Perci
  • Pearcy
  • Piercey
  • Peredur (Welsh)
  • Percival (English)
  • Perseus (Greek)

 

Kenya

Kenya is the name of a country in Africa named after Mount Kenya. The origin of the name itself is not clear-

  • it could be a corruption of the Kikuyu, Embu, and Kamba words Kirinyaga, Kirenyaa and Kiinyaa which mean “God’s resting place” in all three languages. The mountain represents an important aspect within their cultures, believing it was where God lived;
  • it may also come from Kukuyu kere nyaga meaning “white mountain” or “mountain of whiteness”;
  • it could be derived from Akamba kiima kya kenia meaning “the mountain that shines”, kenia being the Akamba word for “shine” or “glitter”;
  • it may also be from the Ameru word kirimira which translates to “mountain with white features”;
  • it may also be translated from Kikuyu to “the place with ostriches”.

Kenya is also a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + to be” (健也)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + how; what; alas; question mark” (健哉)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + all the more; increasingly” (健弥)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + dart, arrow” (健矢)
  • “healthy; health; strength; persistence + question mark” (健耶)
  • “concurrently; and; beforehand; in advance + to be” (兼也)

Written in hiragana it’s けんや (Ken’ya).

Origin: Kikuyu, Embu, Kamba, Akamba, Japanese

 

Variants:

  • Kenia (English)
  • Ken’ya (Japanese) m

 

Kenan

Kenan (pr. kee-nan) is a Hebrew male name possibly meaning “possession” in Hebrew, though it’s possible that it comes from the same root word as Cain either derived from a Hebrew root word qanah meaning “acquired” or “acquisition”, or from qayin meaning “spear” or “smith”.

Kenan might also possibly be an anglicized spelling of Cianán, an Irish male diminutive of Cían meaning “ancient” from Old Irish cían (long, distant, lasting). As a surname, Kenan orignates from Cianán.

Origin: Hebrew, Irish

Variants:

  • Keenan (English)
  • Cían (Irish)
  • Cian (Irish, English)
  • Cianan (Irish, English)
  • Cianán (Irish, English)
  • Kainan (Biblical Greek)
  • Keinan (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Cainan (Biblical Latin)

 

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Iolaus

Iolaus is the name of Hercules’s mortal nephew, the son of his mortal half-brother Iphicles in Greek myth. He not only helped his uncle with some of his Labors, including defeating the Hydra, but he was also depicted as being the lover of Hercules as well. The second element of his name comes from Greek laos meaning “people” while the first element of the name comes from Greek ἰόs meaning “arrow” though it also means “rust” and “poison,venom”, so essentially the name means “arrow of the people”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Iolaos (Ancient Greek)

 

Jared

Jared is the English form of Hebrew name Yared or Yered meaning “descent”, so named because in his time angels descended from Heaven down to earth. Jared could also be related to a root word meaning “to rule, command” and I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “rose”, although I don’t know how accurate that last part is. Jared is also a surname though it doesn’t come from Hebrew but from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Gerard”, Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy);

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Jarod (English)
  • Jarrod (English)
  • Jarred (English)
  • Jerrod (English)
  • Jerred (English)
  • Jered (English)
  • Iared (Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin)
  • Yared (Hebrew, Ethiopian)
  • Yered (Hebrew)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Garrett

Garret is a given name as well as a surname, a form of either Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy); or Gerald, another Germanic name meaning “ruler of the spear” from ger (spear) and wald (ruler, power, leader).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Garet (English)
  • Garret (English)
  • Garett (English)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)
  • Gerald (English, German)

 

Perry

Perry is a nickname for Peregrine, from Latin Peregrinus meaning “traveler”, or Percival, likely based on Welsh Peredur meaning “hard spear” though the spelling of the name was altered to resemble Old French percer val “to pierce the valley”. Perry is also an English surname which comes from Middle English perrie meaning “pear tree”, referring to someone who lived near a pear tree. As a Welsh patrynomic surname it comes from ap Herry meaning “son of Herry”, the latter a medieval English form of Henry meaning “home ruler”. Spelled Perriit’s an Italian surname derived from given name Peter meaning “stone”.

Origin: Latin, Welsh, Old French, Greek

Variants:

  • Peregrine
  • Percival
  • Perri (u)
  • Peri (u)
  • Perrie (u)