Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master).

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek)
  • Martta (Finnish)
  • Marthe (French, Norwegian)
  • Marte (Norwegian)
  • Márta (Hungarian)
  • Morta (Lithuanian)
  • Maata (Maori)
  • Marfa (Russian)

 

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Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Nymphidia

Nymphidia is an Ancient Greek name, the feminine form of Nymphidius, the genitive form of Nymphe or Nympha meaning “bride, bridal, young woman”. Nymphidia later took on the meaning for a beautiful young woman or later to a woman with divine origin. It was used by English poet Michael Drayon (1563-1631) for his poem Nymphidia (The Court of Faery) published in 1627, who was also credited with coining thw word nymphet (meaning little nymph).

Nicknames: Nym, Nydia, Dia

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nimphidia
  • Nympha (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphe (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Nymphidius (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphidios (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphidanus

 

Nydia

Nydia was first used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a character in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii (1834). He may have based it on Latin nidus meaning “nest”, referring to a nest for small animals and insects.

Nydia could also be a contracted form of Nymphidia, an Ancient Greek name meaning “bride, bridal, young woman”.

Origin: Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nidia (Spanish)

 

May

May is the fifth month of the year in English. The name comes from Maiathe name of a Roman goddess of spring, derived from Latin maius meaning “great”. It’s also another name for the hawthorn flower.

May is also a surname though it comes from a different source, likely from Old English may meaning “male relative”, “young lad” and “maiden”. It could also have been derived from a pet form of given name Matthew meaning “gift of Yahweh”.

Origin: Latin, Old English

 

Variants:

  • Maye
  • Maia

 

Zara

Zara is a Bulgarian diminutive of Zaharina, the Bulgarian and Macedonian feminine form of Zechariah, a Hebrew masculine name meaning “Yahweh remembers”, though it could also be a variant spelling of Sara meaning “princess, lady, noblewoman”.

Zara is also the English form of Zaïre, a name created by French writer and philosopher Voltaire for his play Zaïre. He may have based it on the Arabic name Zahrah meaning “flower” or “blooming flower” or from Zahara “shine, sparkle”.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic

Variants:

  • Sara
  • Zahra
  • Zahara

 

 

Neva

Neva is a female with a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • is a short form of Geneva, which itself could be a short form of Genevieve derived from a medieval name, Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin though it could be derived from Germanic elements kuni (kin, family) and wefa (wife, woman). It might also be derived from Gaulish, composed of Celtic genos (kin, family) with an unknown element;
  • Geneva is also the name of a city in Switzerland (also spelled Genava in Latin) which might be derived from Celtic genu meaning “bend, knee” or “mouth” referring to an estuary or a bending river;
  • Neva is also the name of a river that runs from Russia to the Gulf of Finland. The name could be derived from Finnish nevo meaning “sea” though I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Finnish neva meaning “marsh”. Another possible origin is Swedish ny from Old Norse nýr meaning “new”;
  • As well as being a given name, Neva is also a Finnish surname, referring to someone who lived near a marsh or a bog;
  • Neva is also a Spanish word meaning “snow” derived from Latin.

Origin: Germanic, Gaulish, Finnish, Old Norse, Latin