Toyoko

Toyoko is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used:  toyo 豊 (lush, abundant, bountiful, plenty) + ko (child) 子; to 兎 (rabbit, hare) + yo 与 (bestow, impart, participate in, award) + ko 子 (child); to 外 (outside, foreign, other) + yo 世 (generation, age, world, society, public) + ko 子 child); toyo 豊 (lush, abundant, bountiful, plenty) + ko 湖 (lake); to 富 (wealth, enrich, abundant) + yo 世 (generation, age, world, society, public)…

Donna

Donna comes from the Italian word meaning “woman,” or “lady”, used as a title of respect for the lady of the house. It derives from Latin domina (lady, mistress of the house) from a Proto-Indo-European source, either from *demh₂- (to tame, subdue) or from *dṓm (house, home) via root *dem- (to build). Donna could also be used as a feminine form of Donald, the…

Miro

Miro comes from Slavic element miru meaning “peace; world” from Proto-Slavic *mȋrъ derived from a Proto-Indo-European source. Miro is a Slovene and Croatian short form of Miroslav, a Slavic male name meaning “peaceful glory”; though it may also be a short form of names ending in -miro such as Edelmiro (the Spanish form of Ancient Germanic Adelmar meaning “noble famous”). Miro is also an Italian surname derived…

Tomoyo

Tomoyo is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used: “wisdom; knowledge; intellect; reason + generation; world; society” (智世); “ethics; companion + generation; world; society” (倫世); “to know; wisdom + generation; world; society” (知世); “wisdom; knowledge; intellect; reason + substitute; change; convert; world; society” (智代); “friend + generation; world;…

Vladimir

Vladimir comes from Slavic element vladeti meaning “to rule” (derived from Proto-Indo-European *wal “to be strong”) combined with meru (great, famous) essentially meaning “great ruler” or “famous ruler”. However, the second element has also been associated with miru (peace, world) so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Waldomar (Ancient Germanic) Valdimárr (Ancient Scandinavian) Uladzimir (Belarusian) Vladimír…

Svetlana

Svetlana is a Slavic female name meaning “light” which comes from Russian svet (light) derived from Proto-Slavic *svě̑tъ (light; world) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweytos (bright; white). Nicknames: Lana, Sveta Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Svjetlana (Croatian, Serbian) Světlana (Czech) Svitlana (Ukrainian) Svetlina (Bulgarian)  

Devon

Devon is the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area known as the Dumnonii which is made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning “deep” or “world” and *nanto meaning “stream” or “valley” so the name would mean “deep valley” or “deep stream”. It may also be a variant spelling…

Saeran

Saeran seems to be a male name possibly of Irish origin maning “noble” although I’m not sure of the accuracy of that. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Welsh Saer meaning “carpenter, wright” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “Saer the younger” or “little Saer”. There’s a church in Wales called St. Saeran’s Church dedicated to Saint…

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could…

Seiya

Seiya is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some meanings I could find are: 世哉 “world, generation”; 星矢 “star, planet, heavenly body + arrow”; 清耶 “clear, distinct, apparent, pure + father”; 正夜 “correct, righteous + night”; 生八 “life, existence, being + eight”; 成也 “to become, to succeed, accomplish + to be, also, too”; 声弥 “voice + extensive, full, complete”; 盛哉 “prosper”; 聖野 “holy, sacred…

Vadim

Vadim is a Russian male name of unknown meaning. It’s been used as the Russian form of Bademus, the name of a Persian Christian martyr who was killed in Persia and later recognized as a saint. I’ve seen the name as possibly originating from Persian badian meaning “anise, aniseed”. Vadim could also be a short form of Russian Vadimir composed…