Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

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June

June is the sixth month of the year according to the Julian calendar. The name derives from the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and goddess of marriage and women; Hera is her Greek counterpart. Her name is possibly related to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful” from Proto-Indo-European *yeu- meaning “vital force”, related to her role as a goddess of childbirth.

June may also be related to Latin iuniores meaning “the younger ones”.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Junie
  • Juno
  • Junia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Junius (Ancient Roman)

 

Kenji

Kenji is a Japanese male name made up of Japanese elements ken with various meanings of (study, sharpen), (case, matter, example), (strong, healthy); (to stretch, lengthen, extend); (connect, combine, concurrent); (ticket, certificate); (sword); (firm, steady, hard, strict, solid); (to declare, to announce, to proclaim); (build, establish, construct); (constitution, law); (first); (wise, clever, intelligent); and ji with various meanings of (two); (second, next, in order); (govern, regulate, administer); (road, path); (of, one of); (benevolence); (history, record); (child, young); (to take charge, rule); 爾 (you, that way, like this); and likely other meanings depending on the kanji used. Ken can also be used as a given name on its own.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Ken

Gillian

Gillian is the Medieval feminine form of Julian, which comes from the Roman family name Julius which is either possibly derived from Latin ioulos meaning “downy-bearded” or it could be related to the Roman god Jupiter, which is made up of Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky” and pater meaning “father”.

Gillian is also a surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gileáin meaning “son of Gileán”, the latter derived from personal name Gealán, a diminutive of geal meaning “bright, white”.

The name Gillian has two possible pronunciations, either with a hard like Gilbert, or like a j, like Julian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Jillian (English)